FLIPPED by Wendelin Van Draanen | Review

People change. We’re all constantly changing whether we’re conscious of it or not, yet sometimes this fact is ignored in books. In fiction, it’s common for love interests to last forever and for desires to seem set in stone once they appear; however, nothing is permanent in Flipped. In this middle grade novel, Wendelin Van … Continue reading FLIPPED by Wendelin Van Draanen | Review

A Classic Couple: The Woman in White and Gone Girl

What could a classic novel that was initially serialized in the nineteenth century and a recent bestseller that became a successful movie on the big screen possibly have in common? A lot, actually. Though Wilkie Collins’ The Woman in White and Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl were published over a century apart, they are nevertheless linked … Continue reading A Classic Couple: The Woman in White and Gone Girl

My First Week in Oxford | Holly Goes Abroad

Hello from across the pond! I can't believe I've already been here for almost a week-- it simultaneously feels like a month and just a single day. This past week has been spent settling into my room here, exploring Oxford, and learning the ropes of living in a new culture. From vocabulary and customs to … Continue reading My First Week in Oxford | Holly Goes Abroad

THE WOMAN IN WHITE by Wilkie Collins | Review

Wilkie Collins is commonly known as a master of Victorian sensationalist fiction whose work has greatly influenced what we now know as detective and mystery genres of literature. The Woman in White was published as a full novel in 1860 after having been an extremely popular serialized publication from November 1859 to August 1860. Collins' clever … Continue reading THE WOMAN IN WHITE by Wilkie Collins | Review

A Classic Couple: The Song of the Lark and Paper Towns

It seems fitting that books by two of my favorite authors—Willa Cather and John Green—would connect across different centuries. As mentioned in a past Top Ten Tuesday post about pairs of classic and contemporary novels, I’ve found many interesting parallels between Cather’s The Song of the Lark (1915) and Green’s Paper Towns (2008). Thea and … Continue reading A Classic Couple: The Song of the Lark and Paper Towns

Tomorrow is Travel Day! | Holly Goes Abroad

The day I've been awaiting for months is finally around the corner: travel day. Tomorrow I hop on a plane and leave the United States for the first time (eek!). As I talked about in a past post, I'll be studying English literature at Mansfield College within Oxford University during this academic year. Even just writing … Continue reading Tomorrow is Travel Day! | Holly Goes Abroad

TUCK EVERLASTING by Natalie Babbitt | Review

I never realized how many popular children’s books I neglected to read when I was younger until I started talking about them with my friends one day. This led me to read books like Matilda by Roald Dahl and Flipped by Wendelin Van Draanen in the midst of all my required summer reading to take … Continue reading TUCK EVERLASTING by Natalie Babbitt | Review

A Classic Couple: 1984 and Illuminae

It's time for another Classic Couple, a feature inspired by a past Top Ten Tuesday list. George Orwell’s classic novel 1984 is known for being an unsettling masterpiece of dystopian fiction. Its literary influence spans decades since its initial publication in 1949, as shown by the many elements it shares with contemporary fiction such as … Continue reading A Classic Couple: 1984 and Illuminae

On Reading Classics | Discussion

I love classics. A lot of people are surprised when I tell them that classics are my preferred genre. Some people can’t seem to fathom that I genuinely enjoy reading books like Faulkner’s Sartoris and Dickens’ Great Expectations and choose to read them in my free time. Perhaps this bewilderment is due to the bad reputation classics have gained … Continue reading On Reading Classics | Discussion

MIDDLEMARCH by George Eliot | Review

George Eliot’s classic novel Middlemarch has been on my bibliophilic radar for years, though I never found time to read it until it appeared on one of my required reading lists for Oxford. I once had a professor who described Middlemarch as being a “smarter Pride and Prejudice.” This comment immediately intrigued me. What did … Continue reading MIDDLEMARCH by George Eliot | Review