Feminist Fridays: In which I GUSH about EVERYTHING I KNOW ABOUT LOVE by Dolly Alderton

Has this Feminist Fridays feature just turned into me talking about memoirs written by women? Maybe. Am I apologizing for it? ABSOLUTELY NOT. Today's post is just going to be absolutely gushing about how much I adored Dolly Alderton's Everything I Know About Love. Published in 2018, this memoir covers everything from growing up in the suburbs to parties, …

Feminist Fridays: Abbi Jacobson on women in the workplace, anxiety, and personal identity

I read Abbi Jacobson’s memoir I Might Regret This without knowing anything more about her other than what was in the biographical blurb on the back cover. One of my best friends read this book and then immediately recommended it to me and actually gave me her physical copy, which is how I knew she meant business. People …

Feminist Fridays: 8 Empowering Quotes from Sonia Sotomayor

Happy Feminist Friday! Today I'm going to share 8 empowering quotes from Sonia Sotomayor's memoir My Beloved World. Barack Obama appointed Sonia Sotomayor to be an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States in May 2009, making her the first Hispanic and Latina Justice. Born in the Bronx, New York City, Sotomayor was raised …

Feminist Fridays: Michelle Obama on the Importance of Friendships

Feminist Fridays are back! I’ve missed this feature; writing these posts is like a little breath of fresh air each week, giving myself space to vent about some problematic sexist $#!t or highlight amazing people who are empowering, inspirational, and strive for equality. I’d like to kick this feature off after an absence of many …

Feminist Fridays: Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

They say that timing is everything, and reading is no exception. Sometimes you read a book and acknowledge that you probably would have enjoyed it more if you had read it when you were older or younger, in a different mood, or at a different time of year. However, sometimes you read a book at …

Feminist Fridays: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

I was thrilled that part of my postcolonial literature tutorial during my last term at Oxford was reading and writing about Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Fifteen years after the publication of her debut novel Purple Hibiscus in 2003, Adichie continues to make headlines today. Not only is she known as a renowned Nigerian novelist, but she has also made …

Feminist Fridays: Postcolonial Literature & Tsitsi Dangarembga

First, I want to thank you all for being so receptive to my last Feminist Fridays post about postcolonial literature. I didn't expect there to be such resounding interest in this topic, but I'm so happy that there is! Today I'll be talking about a groundbreaking author who does not get nearly enough time in the spotlight as …

Feminist Fridays: Postcolonial Literature, Feminism, and Unexpected Enthusiasm

As of this week I am halfway through my third and final term at Oxford, meaning that by this point I've done enough work to form a solid opinion about my Trinity tutorials. Today I'd like to talk about my unexpected enthusiasm for postcolonial literature and how feminist perspectives play a role in reading and …

Feminist Fridays: Carrie Hope Fletcher

Today I'd like to talk about one my favorite people to watch on Youtube: singer, actress, blogger, and vlogger Carrie Hope Fletcher. I've been a fan of her videos for years (since I was in middle school?!) and it's been amazing to watch her grow and develop her channel over such a long time. I want to …

Feminist Fridays: Pride and Prejudice (circa 1995 BBC)

Jane Austen's classic novel Pride and Prejudice, along with many of her other novels, often receives criticism for depicting women as utterly dependent on men. While I wholeheartedly disagree with this criticism (look at Austen's satire! her wit! her humor! making fun of those who depend on men!), today I'd like to discuss this perspective regarding a …