Bookish

5 Books that Influenced Me as a College Senior

Seeing as I graduate from undergrad a week from tomorrow (eek!) I thought I would share 5 books that influenced me as a college senior. These are books that I’ve read throughout this academic year–assigned or otherwise–that have made me think about myself and world a bit differently. In no particular order:

Without a Name by Yvonne Vera

Yvonne Vera is one of two Zimbabwean women novelists I wrote about in my honors thesis. Going into this honors thesis I was not prepared for how intense, unsettling, and moving Vera’s novels would be. I remember reading the pivotal moment in Without a Name when the full force of the act of violence is revealed: I was sitting in South Station in Boston waiting for the last train of the night after attending a comedy show. (Yes, a rather odd setting to be reading this in!) I audibly gasped and then had to explain to my friends the shocking scene I had just taken in. Physically reacting to a novel like that and feeling the need to immediately talk to someone about it reminded me of the sheer power of literature and the significant influence they can have on whatever you’re going through at the time.

The Master’s Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master’s House by Audre Lorde

This brief essay collection was a gift from a friend that I finally got around to reading this past winter break. I remember reading it in a parking lot while waiting to go into an appointment and actually tearing up a bit. These essays are powerfully striking, so much so that I can see myself going back to them in the future for encouragement, motivation, and inspiration. Even the simplest statements–such as “there are no new pains”–are striking in their trueness, in the way they deeply resonate with the reader. I’m so grateful that my friend gifted me this book!

The Truth About Forever by Sarah Dessen

My friends and I decided to reread this old favorite of ours this past winter break. I hadn’t read it since I was fourteen or fifteen years old, so my memory of it was pretty foggy: I vaguely remembered a catering company and a car breaking down and a mom that was a real estate agent (aren’t they all?), but other than that I was basically going in as a clean slate. Reading this book after seven or eight years made me simultaneously realized how much has changed and how much has stayed the same in my reading tastes. Although I’m now more removed from the age of this book’s protagonist, I nevertheless found myself relating to her dilemmas, albeit in a different way from when I related to them years ago. Now I saw them from a nostalgic perspective, of looking back on that time in my life when I didn’t know what graduating high school or being 20 years old would look like. All in all, rereading The Truth About Forever was a lovely trip down memory lane.

The Latino Threat by Leo R. Chavez

I was assigned to read this book for my Latinos in the U.S. history class early on this semester, and it really changed the way I look at representations of Latinos in the media, on the big screen, and in what I read. The Latino Threat Narrative (the discriminatory idea that Latinos are dangerous, lazy, criminal, and are only in the US to “take advantage” of the system) is shockingly pervasive in our society today, and it seems almost impossible to not run into it in some capacity on a daily basis. Reading this book was also a fantastic way to start this class, as it really summed up a lot of the points that my professor wanted to make throughout the semester. I wish this book–or at least this concept–was mandatory material for high school students. I think having a specific name for this phenomenon really helps you pinpoint it, therefore allowing you to better challenge it in the world around you. Chavez also really forces you to think about how the Latino Threat Narrative plays into where our country is headed in the near future.

The Year of Magical Thinking by Joan Didion

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The Year of Magical Thinking is by far my favorite book that I’ve read this semester. I had never read anything by Joan Didion before, but I will absolutely be turning to more of her witty, honest words in the future. I’ve been fortunate enough to never have experienced such intense loss before, but this book made me feel the closest I have ever felt to experiencing it. I rarely cry while reading, yet this text was bookended by my tears. The last line left me gutted, wanting to reach out and embrace Didion as I sat in bed mulling over her experiences, conflicting emotions, and narration. I would recommend this book to anyone and everyone. • • • • • • #books #book #bookish #booklover #bibliophile #reading #amreading #reader #read #bookstagram #bookblogger #bookblog #blogger #blog #nutfreenerd #bookpics #instabooks #college #englishmajor #literature

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I was assigned to read this book for my Postmodern American Fiction class about a month ago and I haven’t been able to stop thinking about it since. This memoir recounts the year after the death of writer John Gregory Dunne, Didion’s beloved husband. We see her grapple with loss, identity, and the strong pull of the “vortex” of memories as she writes this narrative. Although I often cry while watching movies, it’s actually rare that I cry while reading books; however, I cried twice while reading this book, both times in front of other people. (If that’s not a testament to how stirring this book is, than I don’t know what is…) What strikes me the most about this book is how there is no resolution at the end–grief is not a linear process recovered from after a single year, which The Year of Magical Thinking really reflects.

Have you read any of these books? What are your thoughts on them? What’s a book that greatly influenced you recently? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

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Bookish, Discussion

Avoiding Book Burnout as an English Major

Recently someone asked me in a comment how I avoid burning out as an English major–in other words, how do I keep from getting sick of reading? It might sound implausible that a bookworm could get tired of reading, but it definitely happens. When the line between work and play is blurred, it can suddenly feel like what was once a hobby is now homework–because it is. 

For each term at Oxford I had to read about sixteen novels, plus secondary reading during term itself. For my senior seminar at Wheaton right now I have to read about a dozen novels by Philip Roth–and that’s in addition to all the reading for my other English class, history class, and Honors Thesis. Needless to say, studying English literature involves a lot of reading. When you consider the sheer amount of pages being turned, it’s easy to imagine how someone could want to do something else in their sparse free time besides open even more books. 

So how do I avoid burning out? Here’s my advice:

Switch things up.

One of the problems I’ve encountered studying English literature is that the genre I would usually read for fun (classics) is precisely when I have to read for class. Instead, I try reading different genres, particularly children’s or young adult books. Because they’re different enough from what I read for class, my mind isn’t so quick to associate it with doing work.

Listen to audio books.

Listening to audio books is my favorite way to get extra reading in during the semester without feeling like I’m doing more work. I love not having to feel like I’m spending even more time with my eyes glued to a page, as well as the fact that I can get other things done (like laundry, cleaning, etc.) at the same time).

Make it social.

Join a book club. Read the same book as a friend. Be more active in the book blogging community. Sometimes adding a more social aspect to reading helps it feel less like homework and more like something you’re doing in your precious free time.

Take a break.

Sometimes you just have to accept the fact that bookish burnout is unavoidable without taking a bit of a break from reading for fun. Whenever I feel this tiredness coming on, I usually switch to listening to podcasts, knitting, or some other activity instead. Taking a break from reading doesn’t make you a “bad” bookworm in any way–partially because such a category doesn’t exist. There’s no denying that the reading you do for class is still reading, even if it’s not what you would choose to read on your own.

I hope these quick pieces of advice are helpful! Studying English literature can be surprisingly tricky for self-proclaimed bookworms, and it’s nice to know that it’s not just you falling out of love with reading–sometimes you can have too much of a good thing. 

How do you avoid burning out as an English major or college student in general? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday: Books to Buy Your Rising College Senior

Happy Tuesday!! This week’s Top Ten Tuesday topic (hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl) celebrates the back-to-school season with a school-related freebie. As per usual around this time of year, I’d like to share some fictional book titles that I sincerely wish existed (if you’re looking for the subject of your next writing project, then look no further!). As I start my second to last semester of college this week, I can’t help but wish I had more answers to my many burning questions. Without further ado, here is my list of the Top Ten Books to Buy for Your Rising College Senior:

What do you think of these titles? What books would you buy a rising college senior (real or otherwise)? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

College, Discussion

How I Came to Study English in College (and why I stayed that way)

A few months ago someone commented on one of my blog posts asking if I could write about how I came to study English literature in college. Since my second to last semester of college begins in just two days, I thought now would be a good time to finally answer this question.

Growing up, English was always my favorite subject in school. I hesitate to say that it was my favorite class; unfortunately, English class was often viewed as a bit of a joke, particularly in high school. It wasn’t viewed as a “real” subject worth studying; instead, English class was merely another requirement, an easy class used to boost people’s GPAs. I hated this negative, deceiving, false stigma associated with studying English. This stigma is partly why I started blogging in high school in the first place. I wanted an outlet where I could discuss books without being viewed as strange or being told that I was wasting my time on something that didn’t matter.

You can imagine what people thought when I told them that I wanted to major in English literature in college. This pill was made a bit easier to swallow by the fact that I later wanted to go to law school (phew! people undoubtedly thought. Some practical light at the end of the liberal arts tunnel!) The puzzled glances I received astounded me. What was so bad about studying English?

Then came the inevitable question: Did I want to be a teacher? While there is nothing wrong with being a teacher–it’s one of the most important jobs, in my opinion–it frustrated me that people could only see one path for my future. When I told them I wanted to pursue a career in law, their eyes grew even wider. Most of them said they couldn’t picture me as an attorney–that I wasn’t cutthroat enough, competitive enough, or loud enough. (I don’t know when they started measuring one’s volume on the LSAT, but apparently these people were privy to secret information that I wasn’t). One day while I was checking an old man’s book out at the local library where I worked, he helpfully reminded me that “You have to be smart to be a lawyer, you know.” Fortunately, one of my coworkers stood up for me, chiming in with a generous “Oh, Holly doesn’t have to worry about that.”

But his comment bothered me, and in some way still does. Why did studying English automatically categorize me as a particular kind of person in the eyes of so many people? What gave people the impression that teaching was not only the sole profession that English majors could choose, but that it was also the sole profession that we should choose? What was it about this specific subject that closed its students off from all other occupational pursuits?

However, my time in college as well as my experience holding various job positions has taught me that those people in my high school who held these negative opinions lack any understanding of what it is actually like to study English literature. I like to split my degree into two parts: content and skills. When people look down upon English majors, they often do so by emphasizing the content aspect of the degree. What use is knowledge of obscure books that only other English majors ever read? Who cares what Jane Austen or William Faulkner had to say in their novels? While this view is inherently false in its own right for reasons I’m sure most bookworms understand, it also completely disregards the other half of English degrees.

My favorite aspect of my English degree (and the part that I value most) is that it teaches me how to think critically, work with large amounts of information at once, organize my thoughts, form and defend evidence-based arguments, and write. These are valuable, practical, marketable skills that have served me well in nearly all courses, internships, and jobs I’ve experienced. Although these skills happen to be applied to English literature while earning the degree, they can be applied to any and all contexts: historical texts, financial grant applications, social media pages, etc. I truly believe that the ability to write well is a priceless skill—just ask all of the friends, coworkers, and family members who ask me to edit their writing on a regular basis.

To answer the reader’s initial question, I chose to study English literature in college because reading and writing have always been passions of mine. However, I think a more interesting and important question is why I’ve continued to be an English major after so many people have advised me otherwise. The answer: because I believe the degree offers valuable skills that are essential for my professional success.

What are your thoughts on studying English literature in college? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesdays: Books I Need ASAP

Happy Tuesday!! This week’s Top Ten Tuesday topic (hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl) is technically Books I’d Slay a Lion to Get Early. However, as per usual I’ve decided to switch things up a bit and share the top ten books I need ASAP… of titles that I’ve created myself! (I made a similar post a few months ago with books I’d like Santa to bring me!)

What books do you need ASAP? What do you think of the titles I’ve listed here? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday: Kinds of Summer Readers

Happy Tuesday! Since the bloggers over at The Broke and the Bookish are taking a little break from providing TTT topics this summer, I’ve decided to create a few of my own. This week I’ll be talking about Ten Kinds of Summer Readers. (You know who you are…)

This reader has just a single summer reading goal: CONQUER THAT TBR. Absolutely nothing will stop this bibliophile from checking every last book off of her list by the time autumn comes around.

TBR lists, reading goals, and an aesthetically pleasing agenda book are must-haves for this meticulous bookworm. The Planner knows what she’ll read, when she’ll read it, and what flavor of ice cream she’ll be eating while doing so.

This reader spends the summer doing two things: reading books and talking about reading books. Whether it be recommending books to others, ranting about a recent disappointing read, or gushing about a new favorite, one thing is certain: you never have to worry about having nothing to talk about when this one is around!

This reader simply goes with the flow. They’re so easy-going and spontaneous that “TBR” isn’t even in their vocabulary. They read whatever and whenever suits their fancy without giving a second thought to numbers, page counts, genres, read-a-thons, reading challenges, recent releases, or the latest hyped books.

School might be out for most people, but not this ambitious reader! Whether or not classes are actually in session, this reader is determined to educate themselves by reading a meticulously chosen selection of books.

If you’re looking for this reader, the only places you need to check are ones within a few feet of water. This reader can always be found reading by the ocean, lake, or pool with some snazzy shades and a bottle of sunscreen nearby.

Though this reader is always on the go, she never forgets to bring a book along. You never know when you’ll have time to read while waiting for an appointment, on your lunch break, or even while standing in line at the store (not really, but how funny would that be?).

We’ve all been there: you’re reading in bed, nose-deep in a completely engrossing page-turner, when suddenly you see something outside of your bedroom window… is that DAWN?!?! This reader is perpetually staying up past her bedtime!

This bookworm isn’t just hungry for literature– she always has a snack nearby to crunch, slurp, or lick. Crumbs in the spine? Smears on the pages? That’s simply the price to pay for deliciousness!

This reader keeps up with all the most recent releases and latest bookish treads– and even sets some of her own! You can always rely on her to have the most up-to-date reading recommendations up her sleeve.

What kind of summer reader are you? (If you’re curious, I’m definitely a Planner and a Student at Heart.) Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Tags

School Book Tag

Today I’m here with the School Book Tag! (It might be Friday, but you can bet that I’ll be doing homework all weekend.) I’ve always been one of those students who loves school, despite the fact that I often complain about homework and actually didn’t like my high school very much. I loved school because I love learning, even though the system of doing so isn’t always effectively designed or executed.

Anyways, you can imagine how excited I was when I realized this book tag exists. Thanks so much to Jamie @ Book Pandamonium for tagging me!!

1. Math- Which book left your head spinning in circles?

Life After Life by Kate Atkinson. Not only is this book complicated and a bit confusing, but the plot itself is cyclical in the way it loops back and around through history and the main character’s past. There are so many alternative story lines that it can be rather difficult to keep a tight hold on the actual truth– if an actual truth even exists in this novel. Nevertheless, I highly recommend it!

2. English- Which book do you think has beautiful written expression?

Because I’m a sucker for beautiful writing, there are countless books that I could highlight here. Recently I read George Watsky’s How to Ruin Everything and was taken aback by the writing style. Sometimes lyrical, sometimes punchy, this collection of essays carries the undeniable mark of an articulate spoken word artist and rapper.

3. Physics- Who is your favorite scientifically minded character?

Definitely mathematician Ian Malcolm from Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton. He’s smart, he’s funny, and his refreshing common sense is the only ray of light amidst many of the impulsive, money-hungry characters. (Besides, he’s played by Jeff Goldblum in the film– he gets instant bonus points for that!).

4. Chemistry- Who is your favorite literary couple?

I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again: Taylor and Jonah from Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta are my favorite literary couple ever. I feel like I mention this book in nearly every book tag I post, but I’m not apologizing! (It’s a sign that you should probably read it ASAP!)

5. Biology- Who is your favorite book character?

My favorite book character… ever?!?! I don’t know if I can pick a definitive single favorite character, but the first one that comes to mind is Jane from Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre. Her independence, solitude, and determination are qualities that really resonate with me (I’m also quite jealous of her sense of humor and ability to come up with snappy comebacks on the spot).

6. French- What is your favorite foreign book?

Over the summer I read the English translation of One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez and unexpectedly fell in love with the ethereal writing, the sprawling narrative arc, and the endlessly cyclical nature of the plot.

7. Art- Have you ever judged a book by its cover, even if you weren’t meant to?!

Absolutely. For instance, I love the cover design of The Girls by Emma Cline, but the story itself really disappointed me. I think it had a lot of potential to be suspenseful, exciting, and eye-opening, but it simply fell flat and failed to dig below the surface of anything substantial.

8. History- What was the last historical book you read?

When Everything Changed by Gail Collins. This was actually a graduation gift from my high school AP United States History teacher and I finally got around to reading it over winter break. I highly recommend this book if you’re looking for an engaging, comprehensive, and well-written account of the history of modern American women from a refreshing perspective.

9. Geography- Which literary destination would you really like to visit? 

Stepping away from the rather obvious answers (Hogwarts! The Shire!), I’m going to say Cabeswater from The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater. This enchanting and mysterious setting has never failed to set my imagination into overdrive.

10. Drama- What’s a book that you think has a lot of over-dramatic hype?

Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn. Though I did enjoy this book, I don’t quite feel as though it warranted the explosion of praise that surrounded it at the peak of its popularity. It’s suspenseful and has some surprising twists, but I don’t think it’s anything extraordinary. #sorrynotsorry

Thanks again to Jamie for tagging me!

What do you think of the books that I’ve mentioned? What are your answers to these questions? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Monthly Wrap-Up

FEBRUARY 2017 | Wrap-Up

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WOW, what a month February was!! It feels as though I’ve hardly had time to process the whirlwind of events that have happened recently, so I’m just going to jump right into this wrap up and see what happens.

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In February I read a total of ZERO books.

That’s right: I read nothing in February.

Well, that’s not technically true. I read SO MANY articles and short stories and poems (sonnet overload for my Renaissance Poetry class), but no novels to speak of for the entirety of February. This is the first month in ages that this has happened (years, even?) but I’ve come to accept the fact that it simply can’t be helped. I’m been incredibly busy this semester and free reading time just doesn’t fit into my chaotic schedule. But my spring break starts in two weeks, and you can bet that I’ll be sitting down with a good book (or two or three) when I finally have some free time on my hands!

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My second semester of sophomore year started off with an event I’ve been looking forward to for months: the annual tap show! I’m part of my college’s tap dancing group, and each February we have our annual show. Our opening night had the biggest audience of Tap Out Loud history, and it was amazing to feel the support and appreciation of all of my peers. It was also surreal to see the dance I choreographed to “Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go” by Wham! actually performed on stage. Definitely a night to remember!

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(P.S. That’s me in the pink in the front)

Another great weekend was when some of my friends and I went to the Museum of Fine Art in Boston, MA. I love going to museums but I don’t get to do it nearly as often as I would like. It was so nice to get off campus for a bit and spend a relaxing day admiring some beautiful art. My favorite part of the museum is definitely the Monet room. ❤

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In front of my favorite paintings by Monet.

The fun continued when I went to see the movie version of the musical Newsies. HOLY COW, THIS MUSICAL IS AMAZING. The choreography is so impressive, especially since I had no idea that this was such a physical, energetic, dance-heavy musical. Jeremy Jordan was fantastic and I’ve basically had the soundtrack playing on repeat since that day. If you’ve never listened to Newsies, I highly recommend checking it out!

Then came the magical day when my friends and I went to NerdCon 2017 in Boston. I recently wrote an entire Top Ten Tuesday post about the amazing time I had there, which you can check out by clicking here. I met so many talented, kind, inspiring people who I’ve looked up to for years, as well as some that I’m looking forward to looking up to in the future. It was absolutely surreal to be surrounded by thousands of Nerdfighters (and JOHN AND HANK!!) and I’m so grateful that I had the opportunity to attend such a wonderful event.

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Here are some notable posts from my blog this past month:

Here are some posts that I loved reading this month:

How was your month of February? What was the best book you read? Have you ever had a month where you read nothing? Did you do anything really fun or exciting? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday: Books to Buy for the College Student in Your Life

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Happy Tuesday! The holiday season is fast approaching, which means it’s time for The Broke and the Bookish’s holiday gift guide freebie week! Since I’m currently a college student, I thought I would share some of my expertise about this terrifying, tumultuous, and exciting time of life in the form of the Top Ten Books to Buy for the College Student in Your Life. Let the festive spirit commence!

is everyone hanging out without me coverIs Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? by Mindy Kaling

I feel like I have included this book on countless Top Ten Tuesday lists, but I just can’t help but mention it once more. When I read this collection of personal essays I was inspired by Kaling’s wit, wisdom, and perseverance in the face of numerous obstacles throughout her life. Besides, it’s a hilarious book that’s perfect for getting you to laugh in the midst of stressful final exams!

17802957A Little History of Literature by John Sutherland

What can I say? I’m an English major and a sucker for any book that discusses how literature evolves over time. This book is a concise, well-written, and fascinating read for anyone interested in how the literature we read today came to be. It also helps with adding books to your TBR list (which is both a good and bad thing at the rate that mine is currently growing!).

3109The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan

Let’s face it: us college students are not always the healthiest of eaters. Not only is this book often discussed in college classes (I’ve talked about it in three of mine so far, and it wasn’t even assigned for the class!), but is also contains really interesting and eye-opening information about where our food comes from. It might not make you change what you eat completely, but it will definitely make you think twice about some of the food on your plate!

438353-2The Princess Bride by William Goldman

Though living with friends on campus and being able to study what you’re passionate about is an amazing experience, college can also be an incredibly stressful and scary time. We all could use a good laugh now and then, and The Princess Bride is the perfect medicine! Plus, you can also watch the movie adaptation after you read the book for double to hilarity.

The_BFG_(Dahl_novel_-_cover_art)The BFG by Roald Dahl

I don’t know about other college students out there, but I’m often hit with waves of homesickness and nostalgia while living away from my family back home. Any childhood favorite would fit on this list, but The BFG is my personal go-to pick-me-up whenever I’m feeling down. I mean, just look at that Big Friendly Giant’s adorable ears! They never fail to make me smile.

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger converThe Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

Sometimes we just need to know that someone else understands what it feels like to be a frustrated teenager. Look no further than Holden Caulfield, folks! Though some people think he is unbearably irritating, I’ve had a soft spot for him ever since first reading this novel in English during my freshman year of high school. If nothing else, it will certainly cause those high school memories to come rushing back!

the opposite of loneliness coverThe Opposite of Loneliness by Marina Keegan

Written by a college student who died in a tragic accident, this collection of short stories and essays will make you think, laugh, and want to pick up a pen and write some of your own. I felt a connection with Marina while reading this book, as though she understood what it felt like to be young and confused but determined to push onward.

1984 cover1984 by George Orwell

There’s nothing like this terrifying, disturbing, unsettling dystopia novel to open your eyes to what the future could look like if we let it– and perhaps what the present is already beginning to resemble in some ways. 1984 is perhaps one of the best fictional wake-up calls or warnings that could possibly be delivered. (Orwell’s Animal Farm would also work for this!)

fangirl coverFangirl by Rainbow Rowell

If you’ve read Fangirl, then it’s pretty obvious why it’s the perfect addition to this list. Cath and Wren’s experiences as freshmen in college did wonders to ease my fears about what college would be like. I think it would be so fun to reread this since I’m now a sophomore in college! Oh, how times have changed…

the hobbit coverThe Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

I’ve read this book so many times that I honestly cannot give a specific number. Besides being a captivating and entertaining story, The Hobbit carries an important lesson that college students (and everyone else, really)  can benefit from reading: Though the road is long and there’s an uphill climb at the end, eventually it will all be worth it. Don’t give up!

What books would you buy for a college student? What do you think of the books on my list? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Monthly Wrap-Up

OCTOBER 2016 | Wrap-Up

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The spookiest month of the year has come to a close, and with it has come the beginning of one of my favorite months: NOVEMBER! Enough about the present, though– today I’ll be sharing a bit about what I was up to in October.
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5350384In October I read a total of 4 books:

  1. The Imagined Underworld by James Alex Garza
  2. Becoming Campesinos by Christopher Boyer
  3. Old English and its Closest Relatives by Orrin W. Robinson
  4. Crónica del desamor by Rosa Montero

Unfortunately I’ve been so busy lately that all of the books I read in October were assigned reading for my classes. My favorite book of the month was Old English and its Closest Relatives by Orrin W. Robinson because it was really interesting to see how early Germanic languages evolved and intertwined. If you’re interested in linguistics or language in general, I highly recommend it!

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If I had to sum up October in one word I would say: BUSY. From mountains of homework to longer tap dancing rehearsals and meetings for Student Senate to making decisions about courses and schedules for next semester, lately I’ve felt as though I’ve barely had enough time to eat, work, and sleep. Despite all of this chaos, I still managed to have a pretty great month! I visited my family back home over our brief October break, watched a bunch of scary movies, and had an incredibly fun Halloween weekend with my friends. (I dressed up as a hippie, if you’re wondering.) Though I’ve been feeling really stressed out lately, fun times with friends and family definitely makes it all worth it.

Also, I finally managed to watch Halloweentown, Nightmare on Elm Street, and The Shining. A lot of screaming (and laughing!) ensued, but I thoroughly enjoyed watching them!

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Here are some notable posts from my blog this past month:

How was your October? What books did you read? What fun things did you do? What did you dress up as for HALLOWEEN??? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY