Halloween Creatures Book Tag

BOOO! Happy Halloween, everyone! I hope you’re having a lovely day of spooky celebrations and plenty of candy corn to go around. Today I’d like to celebrate with this Halloween Creatures Book Tag. Thanks so much to Theresa @ The Calico Books for tagging me!

Witch: A magical character or book.

How could I not mention one of my favorite books? The Hobbit is magical in so many senses of the word, from setting and characters to the warm, fuzzy feeling it gives me whenever I return to its faded pages.

Werewolf: The perfect book to read at night.

Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte has always struck me as the ideal book to read under the covers on a dark, stormy night. Is it the eerie setting? Cruel Heathcliff? Bronte’s lyrical writing? Or a combination of them all?

Frankenstein: A book that truly shocked you.

The existence of this book shocked me. I had no idea that my favorite movie and Michael Crichton’s brilliant book Jurassic Park was inspired by The Lost World, a 1912 novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, until I found it in a bookstore one day in Oxford.

The Devil: A dark, evil character.

The Rook by Daniel O’Malley is filled with complicated, ambiguous, surprising characters who may be considered a hero one minute and evil the next. I love a great character twist!

Grim Reaper: A character that should never have died.

I think Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince by J.K. Rowling goes without explanation for this prompt. So sad!

Zombie: A book that made you hungry for more.

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte was the book that made me eager to read more classic literature. What would I be reading nowadays if not for my favorite genre?

Gargoyle: A character that you would protect at all costs.

I’m going to say Jim Burden from My Ántonia by Willa Cather, one of my favorite novels. Ántonia could definitely hold her own, but I’m not so sure about poor Jim…

Vampire: A book that sucked the life out of you.

I really enjoyed reading War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy, but it took a long, long time. A few summers ago I read about a section a week for two months or so–splitting it up over the course of a summer definitely helped!

Ghost: A book that still haunts you.

Beloved by Toni Morrison is one of the most striking, unsettling, powerful, haunting books I have ever read. It’s a novel that stays with you long after you’ve turned the last page.

Demon: A book that really scared you.

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley is hilarious and witty while simultaneously terrifying. What if society goes in this direction? What does our future look like? Huxley offers a frightening example.

Skeleton: A character you have a bone to pick with.

Emma by Jane Austen was such a tedious book to read because I found so many of the characters annoying. I think it might be worth rereading someday, but for now I’m fine just watching Clueless. 

Mummy: A book you would preserve through time.

I have a strange attachment to Founding Brothers by Joseph J. Ellis. I read it for an essay in my AP United States History class during my junior year of high school and I adored it.

Creepy Doll: A cover too scary to look at.

Even the spine of The Shining by Stephen King is creepy. I remember finishing this book while staying overnight in a lodge on a mountain in January… definitely fit the mood of the book!

YOU! Since Halloween is today, I’m not quite sure if anyone will want to do this tag. But if you’d like to, definitely go for it! Happy Halloween!!

What are your answers to these prompts? What do you think of mine? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

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Happy Hobbit Day!

Happy Hobbit Day! What is this day, you ask? September 22nd is the fictional birthday of both Bilbo and Frodo Baggins, the hobbit protagonists of J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, respectively. The holiday was first established in 1978 by the American Tolkien Society.

If you’ve followed this blog for a fair amount of time, you’re likely well aware that The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings are arguably my favorite books ever. (I know. A bold statement to make.) I started reading them when I was in fifth grade and have reread them all countless times since then. I adore their charming wit, their captivating sense of adventure, and the familiar nostalgia they fill me with whenever I flip through their pages again.

In honor of Hobbit Day, I’d like to share some Tolkien-y book photos!

Hope you have a great Hobbit Day! What’s your favorite Tolkien character, book, setting, etc.? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

How I Choose My Books Tag

When I’m not buried under mountains of required reading for coursework, I often ask myself an important question: How do I choose my books? Fortunately, that’s the very same question that this tag attempts to answer! I had never heard to this tag before I was tagged in it, so I’m really excited to take a look at these questions. Thanks so much to Krisha @ Bookathon for tagging me!!

Find a book on your shelves or e-reader with a blue cover. What made you want to pick up this book?

Since I’m currently studying abroad and don’t have access to my actual bookshelves at home, the closest I could come to a blue book is the turquoise Penguin Modern edition of Wendell Berry’s “Why I Am Not Going to Buy A Computer.” I chose this book not only because the design is brilliant but also because Ariel Bissett (one of my favorite booktubers) HIGHLY recommended it.

Think of a book you didn’t expect to enjoy, but did. Why did you read it in the first place? 

This situation happened to me when I tackled War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy last summer. It’s a novel that was always on my list of books that “I Should Probably Read At Some Point Because They’re Really Well Known and Are Referenced In A Lot of Other Things.” However, I finally decided to read it last summer because Laura @ Reading in Bed was hosting a read-a-long and I couldn’t resist.

Stand in front of your bookshelf with your eyes closed and pick up a book at random. How did you discover this book?

Once again using my limited shelves, I picked up Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. I first discovered this book from major blogging hype and purchased a copy so long ago. However, I just got around to read it recently because it’s on my required reading list for Postcolonial Literature this term. Everything comes full circle eventually!

Pick a book that someone personally recommended to you. What did you think of it?

Whenever I think about books people have recommended me over the years, the first one that usually comes to mind is All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr. The librarian at my high school recommended this to me when I was a senior and I LOVED it. Now I’m the one always recommending this brilliant novel to people! I’m so glad I decided to follow her suggestion!

Pick a book that you discovered through Youtube/book blogs. Did it live up to the hype?

I could list so many books in this answer, but I think I’m going to go with An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir. For a while this book was everywhere in the blogosphere, so I decided to give it a try; however, it definitely didn’t live up to my expectations. If you want to read more about why I was disappointed with it, you can check out my book review here. 

Find a book on your shelves or e-reader with a one word title. What drew you to this book?

Since I’ve already used Americanah, I’m going to have to go with Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf because it’s the closest I can get to one word with the books I currently have on my limited shelf. While I was required to read this for two tutorials, I was also drawn to it because the entire novel takes place in a single day. I was so intrigued!

What book did you discover through a film/ TV adaptation?

Years ago I watched The Help movie with my family one night and immediately went to the library to check out the novel of the same name by Kathryn Stockett. Both forms of telling this story are amazing and I would highly recommend them in either order. I think this is definitely a case where the book and the movie are equally as well done.

Think of your all-time favourite book/s. When did you read these and why did you pick them in the first place?

For this question I have to go with The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien I first read this series going into sixth grade (for a book project!), a time in my life when I was a very awkward kid and needed a respite from middle school awkwardness. These books will always hold a special place in my heart. ❤

  • YOU!!!

 

These questions were surprisingly difficult to answer! Thanks again to Krisha for tagging me ❤

What are your answers to these questions? What do you think of mine? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Jingle All the Way Book Tag

MERRY CHRISTMAS!! I can’t believe it’s finally here! To celebrate I’m going to answer some festive questions in the Jingle All the Way Book Tag, which was originally created by The Left Handed Book Lover. Thanks so much to Dani @ Perspective of a Writer for tagging me!!

JINGLE BELLS: A fun, lighthearted book

The Princess Bride by William Goldman? I love this entertaining, hilarious, captivating adventure story, especially the snarky narrator. I highly recommend the movie as well (this is one of the few cases in which the movie rivals the book for me!).

I SAW MOMMY KISSING SANTA CLAUS: A book with a scandalous romance

I don’t know if the relationships in Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights could necessarily be described as particularly “romantic” or “scandalous” per say, but they are certainly memorable!

I’LL BE HOME FOR CHRISTMAS: A book you are determined to reread

I always say that My Ántonia by Willa Cather is one of my absolute favorite books, but I’ve only read it once. I adore rereading books, so I definitely want to read this one again in 2018!

SANTA CLAUS IS COMING TO TOWN: Your most anticipated release of 2017

Definitely Turtles All the Way Down by John Green. I was hesitant at first because I was afraid of being disappointed by all of the hype surrounding his new release, but it actually exceeded all of my expectations.

SILENT NIGHT: A beautiful book that everyone knows

I’m not sure I would say that everyone knows the story of One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez, but everyone definitely should. The lyrical writing in this novel is stunning and the story itself is incredibly captivating.

WINTER WONDERLAND: A book with great world-building

Ah, there’s so many to choose from! I think that I’ll have to go with Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card. This science fiction series has some of the most interesting world-building I’ve ever read… come to think of it, I should definitely finish this series soon!

GO TELL IT ON THE MOUNTAIN: An under-hyped book that is so great you want to tell everyone about it 

I absolutely adored The Rook by Daniel O’Malley when I read it a few years ago but know very few people who actually talk about it. It’s fantastic! So good! Read it! Please!

I SAW THREE SHIPS: Favorite trilogy

Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien. This has been my favorite trilogy for a decade now and I can’t see that changing anytime soon! Unlike with most trilogies, my favorite book in LOTR is actually The Two Towers, the middle one.

RUDOLPH THE RED-NOSED REINDEER: A book with an underdog protagonist who rises up

Holes by Louis Sachar. How could you not want to root for poor Stanley Yelnats as he tries to survive his time at Camp Green Lake.

HAVE YOURSELF A MERRY LITTLE CHRISTMAS: A book that helped you get through troubling times

SO. MANY. I especially love reading The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien whenever I’m stressed or just need to be cheered up. As I explained recently in another book tag I definitely identify with Bilbo.

Thanks again to Dani for tagging me! I hope you all have a lovely holiday filled with family, friends, delicious food, carols, and fresh snow!

What are your answers to these questions? What’s your favorite holiday tradition? How was Christmas for you this year? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

The “Me in Book Characters” Tag

Ever wonder what kind of book characters I would be? Well, I’m here to tell you exactly that. Thanks so much to Ash and Lo @ Windowsill Books for tagging me in this original tag that they created!

  1. Thank the creators of the tag (Us! Ash & Lo @ Windowsill Books)
  2. Thank whoever tagged you!
  3. List 5 book characters who you are most like and explain why.
  4. Tag your friends!

Hermione Granger from Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling

I would be amiss if I didn’t include Hermione at the top of this list, mostly because she was such an influential character to me when I was growing up. I definitely prioritize academics and studying, but I also really value friendship and I’m not afraid to confront someone when I really feel strongly about a cause.

Bilbo Baggins from The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

Like Bilbo at the start of this novel, I would certainly consider myself a homebody. I like being cozy at home instead out on risky adventures– that is, until I inevitably find myself tugged out the door! (I’m looking at you, study abroad…)

Pip from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

Pip isn’t really sure of himself and is definitely still trying to figure things out even when he’s matured in age… sounds familiar!

Jane from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë

Perhaps this one is more aspirational, but I really admire and identify with Jane independence, wit, and thoughtfulness. I’ve always loved her as a character, especially her way of reflecting on her past. Besides, she says the best quotes:

“I am no bird; and no net ensnares me: I am a free human being with an independent will.” 

Matilda from Matilda by Roald Dahl

Reading, reading, reading– that’s me!! When I first read Matilda this past summer I immediately saw myself in this voracious little bookworm. So many trips to the library, so little time!

What book characters are you most like? What do you think of the ones I’ve mentioned? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Location Book Tag

I hope you’ve all had a lovely week! Today I’m here with the Location Book Tag from ages ago (I was tagged in the summer, I think). Thanks so much to Charlotte Annelise for tagging me!!

1. You’re sat in a coffee shop trying to read when a group of excited six year olds come in with their parents and begin screaming in the play area. Which book can you push past the noise and lose yourself in?

Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton. Not only is this book incredibly suspenseful and gripping, but it’s also such a fun story. I could block out any and all noise while reading this!

2. Your (rich) friends dare you to spend the night in a haunted house for an undisclosed but inevitably large sum of money. Which book do you bring to distract yourself with?

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. Imagine reading Frankenstein in such a spooky atmosphere! It’s kind of like the time I read Stephen King’s The Shining while staying at a lodge on a mountain in the wintertime…

3. Though the landscapes are beautiful, your delayed train journey is starting to drag. Which book do you take out?

Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy. While reading this book I couldn’t help but think about the beautiful landscape it must have taken place in.

4. It’s beach time! You have your family and friends around you and don’t want to miss out on the conversation too much but still want to read. Which book do you choose?

Probably something I’ve read before and loved, such as The Outcasts of 19 Schuyler Place by E.L. Konigsburg. I’ve read this book so many times that I feel like I know it by heart at this point!

5. You’re backstage ready for your big emotional scene but the tears just won’t come. Which book do you get out to make you cry?

Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur. This collection of poetry is so emotional, raw, and honest that it’s bound to make me tear up at times.

6. You’re camping in the woods with your friends and you’re the first to wake up. Which book do you read under the early morning light?

Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt. This lovely story set in a magical woods would be perfect to read from a cozy sleeping bag in a tent.

7. You’ve had an amazing day on your solo trip but now that you’re back at the hotel, you’re starting to feel a little homesick. What do you read to feel less lonely?

The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien. This book always reminds me of my childhood and is sure to make me feel less homesick.

8. You’ve been invited for an interview for a place at a prestigious university. Which book do you lay flat on your knee to hide the cover while you wait?

Probably something Shakespeare that I feel like I should have read by now as an English major.

9. The book exchange stall at the library finally has the book you’ve wanted for so long, and you have a book in your bag that you’ve been dying to get rid of. Which do you give away, and which do you take?

I’d give away The Summer I Turned Pretty by Jenny Han and I’d pick up Turtles All the Way Down by John Green.

10. You were just browsing the children’s section of the library and boom, you’re hit with a sudden blast from the past. Which book have you found that you haven’t seen for years but that you used to love as a child?

The BFG by Roald Dahl. I loved this book SO MUCH when I was younger. Recently I reread it and it was everything I remembered and more. Roald Dahl is a brilliant storyteller!

What are your answers to these questions? What do you think of mine? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

I Dare You | Book Tag

Happy Friday!! I hope you’ve all had a great week and are looking forward to an even better weekend. Today I’m here with an exciting tag I’ve never come across before: the I Dare You Book Tag. Thanks so much to Emily @ Mixed Margins for tagging me!

Which book has been on your shelf the longest?

In general, probably Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling. I first read it in second grade and I’ve kept the same beloved, tattered copy ever since– I can’t bear to part with it!

What is your current read, your last read, and the book you’ll read next?

  • Current: Sartoris by William Faulkner
  • Last: The Song of the Lark by Willa Cather
  • Next: VERY UNDECIDED (help?!?!?!)

What book did everyone like but you hated?

I’m going to use my go-to answer for this one: The Summer I Turned Pretty by Jenny Han. I feel like I talk about this a lot, but it was just SO disappointing because everyone else seems to really love it.

What book do you keep telling yourself you’ll read but you probably won’t?

Unfortunately, I’ve been telling myself that I’ll read J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Silmarillion for YEARS but I just haven’t gotten around to it. I tried to start it once when I was younger but immediately set it aside because it was incredibly confusing at the time. I would really love to check it off my TBR list someday, but today is not that day. (See what I did there?!)

What books are you saving for retirement?

To be realistic, probably something huge like War and Peace. 

Last page: Read it first or wait until the end?

Story time: I’m someone who likes to know how many pages are in a book before I start reading it so I can keep track of my progress. Consequently, I always look at the very last page just to see the number. However, when I was reading Looking for Alaska by John Green years ago I accidentally read a HUGE SPOILER when I flipped to the back of the book. (Thanks reading circle questions.) Ever since then I’m always overly cautious when I flip to the back of a book.

In short: DEFINITELY wait until the end.

Acknowledgments: waste of paper and ink, or interesting aside?

I used to always skim the acknowledgments, but now I skip right over them unless I’m particularly interested in what a specific author has to say for some reason. I think they’re important and valuable for the author to include, but from a reader’s perspective I don’t usually give them much thought.

Which book character would you switch places with?

My immediate response is HERMIONE (obviously), but a more creative response would be Blue from The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater. Can you imagine how amazing it would be to go on all of those adventures?!

Do you have a book that reminds you of something specific in your life? (Place, time, person)

SO MANY. Some books I associate with specific songs I listened to a lot when reading them. For instance, The Fellowship of the Ring reminds me of the song “Even Flow” by Pearl Jam because I read most of it in the back of my dad’s truck the summer before sixth grade and apparently he played that song quite often.

Name an interesting book that you acquired in an interesting way.

I’m not sure if this necessarily counts as super interesting, but the first book that comes to mind is my copy of A Little History of Literature by John Sutherland that I bought at the Met gift shop last year when I went to New York City with my friends. The weird part is that we didn’t actually end up looking at art at the Met that day; rather, we had some time to kill before our bus picked us up so we decided to peruse the gift shop.

Have you ever given a book away for a special reason to a special person?

I’ve given a lot of people books for gifts over the years, but besides that I don’t think I’ve given books away for any other special reasons.

Which book has been with you most places?

Ooooh, what an interesting question! I take a lot of books camping with me every year when my family goes tenting for a week in the summer, but the books I bring change each year. I would probably say any of the Lord of the Rings books simply because I’ve read them so many times that they’ve probably been toted around to countless different places.

Any required reading in high school that wasn’t so bad two years later?

Absolutely!! To name a few: The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger, Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury, The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, and Great Expectations by Charles Dickens.

Used or brand new?

Ideally: new. Realistically: used, because they’re usually a lot cheaper.

Have you ever read a Dan Brown book?

Nope! I’m hoping to read The Da Vinci Code at some point, though.

Have you ever seen a movie you liked more than the book?

YES. I really loved the movie version of The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky. The book was great as well, but something about the movie has always stuck with me. (Also, it has a fantastic soundtrack!)

Have you ever read a book that made you hungry (cook books included)?

The first book that comes to mind is Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert (especially the Italy section!).

Who is the person whose book advice you’ll always take?

I always take my friends’ advice about books– luckily they have excellent taste in books!!

Is there a book out of your comfort zone (e.g., outside your usual reading genre) that you ended up loving?

Last semester I took a history class about Modern Spanish America that focused primarily on Argentina and Mexico from 1800 to the present. We read several monographs for that class that I expected to have to trudge through, but I ended up actually really enjoying the majority of them. The two that were the most interesting to me were Becoming Campesinos by Christopher Boyer and Lexicon of Terror by Marguerite Feitlowitz. They weren’t necessarily uplifting or enjoyable reads, but they were incredibly eye-opening, thought-provoking, and valuable ones.

What are your answers to these questions? What are you currently reading? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

The Reader Confession Tag

Hello, hello! Today I’ll be answering some interesting bookish questions in the Reader Confession Tag. I think the concept of “reader confessions” is really interesting because certain topics tend to be thought of as “taboo” or “controversial” even though many of us actually agree with each other. Hopefully these answers help shed some light on our similarities. Thanks so much to Shar @ Virtually Read for tagging me!!

Have you ever damaged a book?

Yes, unfortunately. Anyone who’s been a student knows how difficult it can be to keep paperbacks pristine in a backpack stuffed with spiral notebooks, office supplies, and gym clothes. (And don’t even get me started on the horrors of crowded school bus seats…)

Have you ever damaged a borrowed book?

Not that I can remember? Apart from a few scratches and dents, I tend to take pretty good care of my books, especially if they belong to someone else.

How long does it take you to read a book?

It definitely depends on the type, length, writing style, and subject matter of a book. If the book is short or I’m really interested in the story or topic then it’s likely that I’ll read it over the course of a single free day or weekend. On average, I’d say that it usually takes me about a week.

Books that you haven’t finished?

I very, very rarely DNF books– to the point where I think I’ve only completely given up on a handful or two of books in my life. The most recent example that I can think of is from a few years ago when I tried reading Dairy Queen by Catherine Gilbert Murdock and couldn’t get past the first one hundred pages. I could only handle so many bad puns on cows, dairy, and farming before I had to put it down for good.

Hyped/ Popular books you didn’t like?

Despite the overwhelming praise I’ve heard for this novel and the two other books in the trilogy, I was disappointed when I read The Summer I Turned Pretty by Jenny Han. The personality of Belly, the main character, just didn’t click with me at all and I found it difficult to relate with her dramatic outlook on life. I really wanted to like this book– I even read it on the beach to try to get in the mood!– but sometimes you just can’t win.

Is there a book you wouldn’t tell anyone you were reading?

No. I’m really transparent about what I read (as you can probably tell from the nature of this blog) so I can’t see myself “hiding” the fact that I’m reading a certain book from someone.

How many books do you own?

Too many to count! I’m currently in the process of trying to read all of the books I own and then get rid of the ones I don’t want anymore and won’t read again. Since starting college I’ve accumulated a ridiculous amount of books (mostly textbooks and novels from English classes) so my bedroom at home now resembles the back room of an overflowing bookshop. There are piles of books everywhere!

Are you a fast reader or a slow reader?

Recently I made a post talking all about reading speed, so I’ve actually done a few different reading speed tests online. Apparently I read an average of about 497 words per minute. Considering that the average adult reads around 300 wpm and the average college student reads about 450 wpm, I’d say that I’m a pretty average reader. Numbers aside, I don’t really consider myself a fast reader; rather, I just spend a lot of time reading.

Do you like to buddy read?

I’ve only actually done a buddy read once before (when I read When We Collided with Peyton @ A Bookish Mess). I really enjoyed it, but my problem is that I don’t always have time to coordinate reading a book with someone else. I’m always afraid that I’m going to commit to reading a book with someone and then have to back out at the last minute due to a lack of free time. But if anyone is interested in potentially doing a buddy read this summer, I’m all ears!

Do you read better in your head or out loud?

I definitely read better in my head. Sometimes I’ll try reading aloud if I’m having trouble focusing or if a text I’m reading for class is written with a thick dialect or accent, but usually I find that it just slows me down.

If you were only allowed to own one book, what would it be and why?

This question is so difficult!!! I probably give a different answer each time I’m asked this question, but for now I’ll go with The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien. It’s a book I always turn to whenever I need to read something comforting, so I think it would be a great one to have on hand. Besides, I don’t think I could ever get tired of reading it!

What are your answers to these questions? What do you think of mine? Have any other reader confessions of your own? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Stationary Book Tag

book-courtship-3

Hello, hello! Today I bring you another tag, this time about one of my favorite things: stationary! I love school supplies, paper products, pens, pencils, notebooks– if it can be found in an office supplies store, then chances are that I adore it. Luckily, this lovely Stationary Book Tag exists for stationary lovers such as myself. Thanks so much to Giovanna @ Book Coma Blog for tagging me!

suspense-22

  • Thank the creator: Sam @ RiverMooseReads, Thank you!
  • Answer the questions.
  • Add pictures! (If you want to)
  • Tag (about) 5 people.

suspense-23

The_BFG_(Dahl_novel_-_cover_art)PENCILS: FAVORITE CHILDREN’S BOOK.

Definitely The BFG by Roald Dahl. I reread this childhood favorite of mine this past summer for the first time since fifth grade and I absolutely adored it. How can you say no to the Big Friendly Giant’s cute, oversized ears?

the great gatsby coverPENS: A BASIC STAPLE FOR ANY READER.

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, hands down. There are just so many great reasons to read this classic American novel– the beautiful writing style, the many modern references to the story, the abundant symbolism and questions and raises about the so-called “American Dream.” I think everyone should read about good ol’ Gatsby!

the hobbit coverNOTEBOOKS: BOOKS YOU OWN MULTIPLE COPIES OF.

Surprisingly enough, I think the only book I own multiple copies of is The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien. I’ve thought about buying different editions of the same book depending on the different covers, but I just can’t justify spending the money when I already own a copy of it.

A Darker Shade final for IreneMARKERS: BOOKS WITH BEAUTIFUL COVERS.

A Darker Shade of Magic and the other books in this fantasy series by V.E. Schwab. I love the color scheme as well as the simple but interesting use of geometric shapes. Plus, just look at that font!

harry potter and the sorcerer's stone coverGLUE: TWO CHARACTERS THAT WORK TOGETHER EVEN IF THEY AREN’T TOGETHER.

Luna Lovegood and Neville Longbottom from the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling. I’ve always wanted these two wonderful characters to end up together– they’re both quirky and kind and would be so cute as a couple!

29069989SCISSORS: WHAT BOOK WOULD YOU LIKE TO DESTROY.

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by J.K. Rowling, Jack Thorne, and John Tiffany.  (A bit harsh? Maybe. Do I apologize? Not in the slightest.) I was just really disappointed with this book, as you can probably tell.

Gregor the Overlander by Suzanne CollinsART KIT: WHAT COMPLETED SERIES YOU OWN.

From my glory days in the elementary school reading enrichment program I still own the entirety of the Gregor the Overlander series by Suzanne Collins. This was back before she was of Hunger Games fame… boy, that feels like ages ago!

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  1. Marta @ The Book Mermaid
  2. MC @ Blame It On The Books
  3. Emily @ Rose Read
  4. Conny @ Literati Girl
  5. Amy @ Curiouser and Curiouser

What are your answers to these questions? What do you think of the books that I’ve mentioned? What is your favorite kind of school supplies? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday: Books to Buy for the College Student in Your Life

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Happy Tuesday! The holiday season is fast approaching, which means it’s time for The Broke and the Bookish’s holiday gift guide freebie week! Since I’m currently a college student, I thought I would share some of my expertise about this terrifying, tumultuous, and exciting time of life in the form of the Top Ten Books to Buy for the College Student in Your Life. Let the festive spirit commence!

is everyone hanging out without me coverIs Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? by Mindy Kaling

I feel like I have included this book on countless Top Ten Tuesday lists, but I just can’t help but mention it once more. When I read this collection of personal essays I was inspired by Kaling’s wit, wisdom, and perseverance in the face of numerous obstacles throughout her life. Besides, it’s a hilarious book that’s perfect for getting you to laugh in the midst of stressful final exams!

17802957A Little History of Literature by John Sutherland

What can I say? I’m an English major and a sucker for any book that discusses how literature evolves over time. This book is a concise, well-written, and fascinating read for anyone interested in how the literature we read today came to be. It also helps with adding books to your TBR list (which is both a good and bad thing at the rate that mine is currently growing!).

3109The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan

Let’s face it: us college students are not always the healthiest of eaters. Not only is this book often discussed in college classes (I’ve talked about it in three of mine so far, and it wasn’t even assigned for the class!), but is also contains really interesting and eye-opening information about where our food comes from. It might not make you change what you eat completely, but it will definitely make you think twice about some of the food on your plate!

438353-2The Princess Bride by William Goldman

Though living with friends on campus and being able to study what you’re passionate about is an amazing experience, college can also be an incredibly stressful and scary time. We all could use a good laugh now and then, and The Princess Bride is the perfect medicine! Plus, you can also watch the movie adaptation after you read the book for double to hilarity.

The_BFG_(Dahl_novel_-_cover_art)The BFG by Roald Dahl

I don’t know about other college students out there, but I’m often hit with waves of homesickness and nostalgia while living away from my family back home. Any childhood favorite would fit on this list, but The BFG is my personal go-to pick-me-up whenever I’m feeling down. I mean, just look at that Big Friendly Giant’s adorable ears! They never fail to make me smile.

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger converThe Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

Sometimes we just need to know that someone else understands what it feels like to be a frustrated teenager. Look no further than Holden Caulfield, folks! Though some people think he is unbearably irritating, I’ve had a soft spot for him ever since first reading this novel in English during my freshman year of high school. If nothing else, it will certainly cause those high school memories to come rushing back!

the opposite of loneliness coverThe Opposite of Loneliness by Marina Keegan

Written by a college student who died in a tragic accident, this collection of short stories and essays will make you think, laugh, and want to pick up a pen and write some of your own. I felt a connection with Marina while reading this book, as though she understood what it felt like to be young and confused but determined to push onward.

1984 cover1984 by George Orwell

There’s nothing like this terrifying, disturbing, unsettling dystopia novel to open your eyes to what the future could look like if we let it– and perhaps what the present is already beginning to resemble in some ways. 1984 is perhaps one of the best fictional wake-up calls or warnings that could possibly be delivered. (Orwell’s Animal Farm would also work for this!)

fangirl coverFangirl by Rainbow Rowell

If you’ve read Fangirl, then it’s pretty obvious why it’s the perfect addition to this list. Cath and Wren’s experiences as freshmen in college did wonders to ease my fears about what college would be like. I think it would be so fun to reread this since I’m now a sophomore in college! Oh, how times have changed…

the hobbit coverThe Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

I’ve read this book so many times that I honestly cannot give a specific number. Besides being a captivating and entertaining story, The Hobbit carries an important lesson that college students (and everyone else, really)  can benefit from reading: Though the road is long and there’s an uphill climb at the end, eventually it will all be worth it. Don’t give up!

What books would you buy for a college student? What do you think of the books on my list? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY