Books

GOOD OMENS by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman | Review

One second, I graduated college. The next second, it seemed like everyone on earth was suddenly obsessed with Good Omens by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman, both in novel and television series form. Eager to know what everyone was gushing about, I quickly hopped aboard this angelic/demonic train and listened to the audiobook. First, I would highly recommend this audiobook because the narrator does excellent voices for all of the characters and it’s very entertaining. Second, I recommend this book in any format because it’s witty, clever, bizarre, hilarious, thought-provoking, and downright brilliant in every way. Because my thoughts about this book are still a jumbled, excited, enthusiastic mess, here are a bunch of reasons why you should read it:

  • Aziraphale and Crowley are described as polar opposites but over the course of the book you realize that they are actually more like one another than either would like to admit.
  • The banter between Aziraphale and Crowley—and between all of the characters, to be honest.
  • Even the demons are likeable.
  • It’s brimming with Neil Gaiman’s signature eerie, twisted charm (I’ve never read anything just by Terry Pratchett, so I can’t speak for his writing.).
  • It’s the most hilarious book about the apocalypse you will ever read.
  • All of the little details fit together in the end.
  • The story hops between a bunch of different characters and plot lines, but it never feels confusing, hurried, or out of place.
  • I laughed out loud many times while listening to this on my way to work. People in the cars next to me at stop lights must have thought I was having a bit too much fun on my 7am commute.
  • I love books that span several generations with characters, from kids and teenagers to adults and the elderly (and in this case, the immortal). This novel has them all, and then some.
  • You will one hundred percent want Aziraphale and Crowley to end up together.
  • Everything about this book is unpredictable.
  • Just when you think you’ve got Gaiman and Pratchett’s next move figured out, they throw a curveball at that makes you want to shake your fist in the air angrily and shout expletives. Instead, you keep reading. You have to figure out their next move, after all.
  • The ending is surprising and sweet (albeit a bit abrupt).

Overall, Good Omens is decidedly and resolutely unlike any other book I have ever read. (I feel like I say that every time I read something that Neil Gaiman has had a hand in, but that’s because it’s true every time.) I still haven’t watched the TV series (shocker knowing me, am I right?) but it’s definitely on my list of Things to Watch When I Finally Get Around to Watching Something Instead of Reading. And now I also need to read something by Terry Pratchett because this book was just so, so good. Would absolutely highly recommend Good Omens to everyone, even if angels and demons and the apocalypse and witch hunts don’t really sound like your kind of book—trust me, it will be after you read this one.

What are your thoughts on Good Omens? Have you seen the TV series? Which Terry Pratchett book should I start with? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “GOOD OMENS by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman | Review”

  1. I am also trying to jump on this bandwagon! My friend absolutely adored the series, and I just bought the book to read it before also someday maybe who knows when watching the show. I’m so glad to hear you liked it!

    Also love that you’re having a great time during your 7AM commute. 😂 I always feel similar in mine because I put on high energy music to wake myself up and then jam out the whole way there, so I always feel like I’m getting odd looks, too!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s