5 Classics for June

In this series, I recommend five classics each month that remind me of that particular time of the year. June has always struck me as a strange mix of peace and chaos, of beauty and discomfort, of consistency and change. I think this past month has definitely embodied those contradictions, as flowers bloom in the midst of so much pain and uncertainty. For this list of recommendations, I’ve chosen five classics that also contain inherent contradictions.


Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf. This entire novel takes place over the course of a single day in June and contains a lot of language and imagery surrounding this month: “…what she loved: life, London, this moment of June.” Whenever I think of June I always think of this striking, poignant, beautifully written novel. Its two main story lines also provide the juxtapositions that I often associate with June.

The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde. What may seem at first like a silly play unfolds to reveal a witty, satirical look at society, class, and social conventions. If you’re a fan of Wilde’s novel The Picture of Dorian Gray, then I highly recommend giving this one a try.

Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift. What appears to be a whimsical, hilarious of strange beings and countries that Lemuel Gulliver stumbles upon is actually a satirical account of society in the early eighteenth century.

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain. Another satirical read, this one about race and childhood and society along the Mississippi River in the 1840s. An in important message runs beneath Tom Sawyer’s adventures and antics.

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll. This topsy-turvy tale of a girl just looking for some entertainment contains creatures and scenes both whimsical and frightening.


I hope you’ve enjoyed this classics guide for the month of June!

With books do you associate with the month of June? What do you think of the books I’ve mentioned? Which books would you add? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

33 Replies to “5 Classics for June”

  1. I associate summer time with the childhood classics, such as Harry Potter. During the long summer holiday (3 months starting from 15th of June) I usually had more time to read books of my own choice, so reading series was one of my favourite pastimes. Ah, those times 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I read Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland some time ago but really enjoyed it!! Lewis Carroll’s writing is just as great as the original (kind of creepy) illustrations. I haven’t read anything by Oscar Wilde yet which I want to change as soon as possible. Thank you for this list and great post, Holly!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Importance of Being Earnest is honestly one of my favorite plays ever. Oscar Wilde is just the best in general, but Importance is just–UGH SO GOOD. It’s also such a great summer rec, so thank you for reminding me it exists so I can go reread!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Great list! I love Mrs. Dalloway. The stream of consciousness format makes it such a unique read. Alice in Wonderland is a great read for all seasons, though summer fits best I think!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Whenever you do these it always throws me back to my degree. I loved reading Alice in Wonderland and Mrs Dalloway at university.

    I actually have been meaning to read The Importance of Being Earnest forever – it just seems like one of those I really should have read by now!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The Importance of Being Earnest is such a great one–hope you enjoy! And writing these posts takes me back to my degree as well–I love writing them ❤

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s