Top Ten Tuesday: For Outdoorsy Bookworms

Happy Tuesday!! The lovely bloggers behind The Broke and the Bookish are back with their weekly TTT themes and we’re starting off with a great one. Since today’s topic is open-ended, I’ve decided to share my Top Ten Book Recommendations for Outdoorsy Bookworms. My love for camping, hiking, and spending time in the mountains tends to be reflected in the books I read. Whether you love quality time in the great outdoors or simply like to read about it from the comfort of your reading nook, here are ten books for the outdoorsy bookworm:

Are you outdoorsy? What are your favorite books about the outdoors? What are your thoughts on the books I’ve mentioned? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday: My Bookstagram Process

Happy Tuesday!! We’ve made it to the last week of TTT before the bloggers over at The Broke and the Bookish come back with their great themes. As a last hurrah I’m going to share something silly and fun: 10 steps of my bookstagram process.  I started my bookstagram account (@nutfreenerd) over a year ago and I’m so glad I did! Not only do I love looking at everyone’s gorgeous photos, but I also love interacting with other bookworms.

Anyone who posts bookish photos knows how ridiculous taking them can feel sometimes (especially in busy places!) but that’s also what makes it fun. Whether you’re inside, outside, or somewhere in between, one thing is certain: taking photos can definitely be a process. Here’s my bookstagram photo-taking process:

1. Choose a location.

This is a beautiful park near my house that’s my new favorite photo spot.

The first thing to do it decide where you’ll be taking pictures. Inside? Outside? Outside in your front yard or somewhere else? Lately my account’s feed alters between inside and outside pictures so I end up doing a fair amount of both locations.

2. Choose books.

SO MANY BOOKS. This step usually takes me a long time and results in a tornado of books on my bedroom floor.

3. Pack.

Can I fit my entire bookcase into a backpack from middle school? CHALLENGE ACCEPTED. (And ultimately failed…)

4. Transport and set up. 

Sometimes this step is easy, particularly if I stay inside and decide to take photos using my phone. However, it can get tricky when I go to the park with my camera, tripod, and bag of books. There’s so much to lug around!

5. Choose a few different angles.

Finding new angles is one of my favorite aspects of taking photos. Just when you think you’ve exhausted them all, a new one jumps out at you!

6. Actually take the photos.

When you realize the lens cap is still on the camera *face palm*

Here it is, folks: the moment we’ve all been waiting for. Bust out those cameras and say CHEESE.

7. Take even more photos.

I’m always afraid that my camera is out of focus or the lighting isn’t good enough, so I make sure to take WAY MORE photos than I’ll ever need. Chances are that at least one of them will be decent, right?

8. Resist the urge to photograph Watsky’s book for the billionth time.

Note: This step nearly always fails.

This is a hard one– perhaps the most difficult step of them all. If you look at my account you’ll notice that How to Ruin Everything appears in SO MANY of my photos… it’s just such a beautiful cover design!!

9. Sort.

Jumping in the air looked way cooler in my mind, I promise.

Taking a million photos at a time means that there are a million photos to sort through later. Sorting is key because you inevitably end up with ridiculous photos like the one shown above.

10. Post!!!

Finally, it is time to post your photos. I love reading and replying to everyone’s comments!!

Are you part of the bookstagram community? (Let me know so I can follow you!!) What is your bookstagram process like? Do you have a favorite book to photograph? Do you follow a posting schedule? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday: MUGS

Happy Tuesday!! There’s still some time until the bloggers behind The Broke and the Bookish return with their weekly Top Ten Tuesday themes, so I’m back with another one of my own. Today I’ll be talking about things that are incredibly near and dear to my heart: MUGS. If you know me, then you’re probably aware of my mug problem. I own SO MANY mugs, it’s kind of ridiculous. It’s hard to explain what I love so much about them… they’re just so cozy and comforting and cute. In no particular order, here are my top ten favorite mugs that I own:

1 || The Blue One.

I got this mug at Bennington Pottery a few years ago when I drove up to Vermont to tour Bennington College. Though I ended up not going there for school, I would definitely take a trip back up just to check out that pottery store again. This mug is the perfect size and the stuff it’s made of keeps the heat of steaming tea in for so long.

2 || The One with Quotes.

I received this mug as a Christmas gift from one of my best friends during our freshman year of college. As you can tell, it didn’t take her long to realize how much I love books! This mug is covered in famous first lines from classic novels.

3 || The One with the Cool Handle.

Isn’t this the niftiest mug handle you’ve ever seen??? It’s perfect for when your hands are really cold because you can rest your hand right in there and absorb all of the heat from the tea. I don’t remember where I got this mug, but I love it.

4 || The Figment One.

I got this mug on my first trip to Disney World when I was younger because I LOVE Figment the dragon. Come to think of it, this might be the very first mug I ever owned?!

5 || The Wheaton One.

I adore this mug so much. It’s simple, it’s the perfect round shape and size, and it holds just the right amount of tea. (It’s also great for eating ice cream out of…) I got this at the Wheaton bookstore when I first decided I wanted to go there.

6 || The SGA One.

Being part of the Student Government Association is one of my favorite things about Wheaton. This mug was a Christmas gift to all of the Senators during my freshman year and now I use it as a pencil holder on my desk.

7 || The Pizza John One.

I was SO HAPPY when I got this mug back in middle school because it finally made me feel like an official Nerdfighter. I love this mug so much that I use it to hold my toothbrush and toothpaste when I’m at school. (I bet I’ve freaked out some people in the bathroom that way…)

8 || The Big One.

Shhhh! I don’t actually own this mug!!! Technically this is my brother’s mug, but it holds SO MUCH tea that I can’t help but steal it on chilly mornings.

9 || The One from White Lake State Park.

My family has gone camping at White Lake State Park every summer for the past twelve years. It’s one of my favorite places in the world, so naturally I had to purchase this mug.

10 || The Oxford One.

My amazing parents recently surprised me by ordering this mug from the actual Oxford University shop in England. You should have seen my face when I opened the package—I was ECSTATIC. Just look at this adorable mug! I love the small size, the simple design, and the fact that it’s specific to the actual college I’ll be studying at within Oxford.

Do you have a favorite mug (or mugs!) that you like to use? What do you think of my mugs? Do you have a collection of random things? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday: How to Read More

Happy Tuesday!! The bloggers behind The Broke and the Bookish are taking a quick break from hosting Top Ten Tuesdays this summer, so I thought I would continue on in the meantime with some topics of my own. Recently someone asked me a question I’ve been asked a million times: How do you read so much? Usually my response is something along the lines of: “…I just do?” However, today I’m going to actually answer this question by sharing my Top Ten Ways to Read More. (Spoiler alert: the last reason is the most important!!)

1 || Carry a book with you. This is one of the most important and effective ways to read more because you simply can’t read if you don’t have a book with you. There are so many hidden pockets of reading time throughout the day, from sitting in waiting rooms and taking public transportation to lunch breaks and random bits of downtime between appointments or meetings.

2 || Listen to audio books. Though I would much rather read a paper book than listen to a recording, I must admit that audio books are a golden key to optimizing reading time. I know people who drive, cook, clean, and exercise all while listening to audio books. Just think of how many books they must go through in an average week!

3 || Designate reading time. If you’re anything like me, you thrive on structure, routines, and schedules. I find it helpful to set aside certain times for reading, such as before going to sleep or when I have a free Sunday afternoon. This doesn’t have to be a daily occurrence; rather, it could be as simple as deciding to read for an hour instead of watching Netflix on a Wednesday night after dinner.

4 || Set realistic, achievable goals. Telling yourself you’ll be able to finish the entirety of Tolstoy’s War and Peace in one night and still have time to paint your nails before bed is probably not the most realistic goal to set. (Unless you can actually do this, then by all means LET ME KNOW YOUR SECRETS.) Instead, set yourself small goals that can be achieved fairly quickly and easily. I usually like to do this by focusing on chapters or page numbers.

5 || Find a reading buddy. For those of you who work best alongside others, find someone or a group of people to read with. Book clubs are great for helping you read more: not only do they hold you accountable for reading on a regular basis, but they also spread enthusiasm and a contagious bookish excitement. A reading buddy could also just be someone you talk to about books occasionally or even a fellow blogger

6 || Take breaks. This might sound counterintuitive, but hear me out. As with any activity, it’s possible to feel burnt out after reading so much. When you feel a reading slump coming on, do yourself a favor and set the books aside for a while. Sometimes all you need is some time away from the page to recharge your bookworm batteries. Then you’ll be ready to read even more!

7 || Be aware of time and space. Where do you feel the most comfortable reading? Are you an early bird or night owl? Knowing when and where you prefer to read will only better the chances that you’ll be focused and engaged in what you’re reading when you finally curl up with a book. For instance, my favorite reading spot is outside on a sunny day or in this particular cozy chair in my living room on a cold night.

8 || Read in bed… at your own risk. I’ve always loved reading before bed, but I do admit that it’s not always the most productive reading time ever. Sometimes I fall asleep, sometimes I get tired and head to bed early after reading only a chapter or two, sometimes I’m sitting in a position that makes taking notes awkward… This is really up to personal preference, but I’ve found that if I solely rely on time before bed to read I usually get very little reading time during the week.

9 || Get rid of distractions. I’m sure we’ve all experienced the temptation to sneak a peek at your phone, check your inbox, or even take a scroll through Tumblr in the midst of reading. There’s nothing wrong with taking breaks to do these things… unless your goal is to get more reading done! To prevent being distracted, try putting your phone on silent or at least shutting off most notifications if you’re sitting down to read for a bit.

10 || Make reading a priority. To be honest, I think this is the single most important and effective rule on this list. If reading is a priority in your life as a hobby you’re bound to do it more often. The real reason I’m able to read so much is because I want to, so I do. Some people spend their free time binge-watching Orange is the New Black on Netflix or watch streams of hilarious cat videos on Youtube, other people enjoy painting or running or dancing or playing soccer—I choose to spend the majority of my free time reading.

What are your tips for reading more? What do you think of the advice I’ve given here? Have you ever been asked how you read so much? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday: Reasons to Love Your Library

Happy Tuesday! Since the lovely bloggers behind The Broke and the Bookish are taking a summer hiatus from creating TTT topics, I’ve decided to come up with some of my own for the next few weeks. This week I’ll be sharing my Top Ten Reasons to Love Your Library. As someone who worked at a library throughout my high school years I always look forward to visiting my local one on a regular basis during the summertime. I know everyone has their own personal preferences when it comes to the formats of books they like to read (new, used, borrowed, digital, etc.) but I really think that libraries deserve more credit than they often receive! Here are ten reasons to give your local library a little more love:

1. Borrowing books = FREE. This is an obvious reason, but for many people I think it’s the most important one. I could never afford to buy all of the books I read because that number is just way too high.

2. Variety. Borrowing books from libraries allows me to read as much as I like without having to worrying about wasting money on a book that I might end up not enjoying. You can also check out audio books, DVDs, etc.

3. Convenience. I don’t know about you all, but the nearest bookstore is about half an hour away from the tiny town I live in. That’s the great thing about local libraries—mine is literally three minutes from my house!

4. Cuteness. Who doesn’t love seeing a bunch of adorable kiddos running around the kids’ room all excited about books?

5. Programming. Most libraries have some sort of programming going on, especially during summer when kids are out of school. Even though my local library is super tiny they still hold a lot of fun events like ice cream socials, book clubs, presentations from cool speakers, craft projects, etc.

6. That old book smell. Okay, I know this is a weird reason but just hear me out. You know sort of musty smell that books get with age? I love that smell, and my local library is full of it.

7. Spontaneous reading. Some of the best books I’ve ever read have been ones that I’ve randomly plucked from the shelves of the library. One example of this is Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta, which I picked up on a whim one day in middle school because it seemed interesting. It is now one of my all-time favorite books and I definitely wouldn’t have read it without seeing it on a library shelf!

8. Librarians. Librarians are the best. Not only are they super helpful when you need to find a book, but they also give the best recommendations. (Shout out to my high school librarian!!)

9. Finding things in books! This is another weird reason, but I’ve found so many cool things in books I’ve borrowed from the library. My favorites have been stickers, random notes, and those due date cards that we don’t use anymore.

10. Community. One of my favorite things about going to my local library is catching up with my former coworkers. Even if you haven’t worked at your local library there is nearly always a vibrant, friendly community of book lovers to be found there! Between book clubs, events, and general discussion at the circulation desk, there are plenty of opportunities to socialize with other bookworms.

Do you use libraries a lot? Why or why not? What are your favorite things about libraries? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday: Kinds of Summer Readers

Happy Tuesday! Since the bloggers over at The Broke and the Bookish are taking a little break from providing TTT topics this summer, I’ve decided to create a few of my own. This week I’ll be talking about Ten Kinds of Summer Readers. (You know who you are…)

This reader has just a single summer reading goal: CONQUER THAT TBR. Absolutely nothing will stop this bibliophile from checking every last book off of her list by the time autumn comes around.

TBR lists, reading goals, and an aesthetically pleasing agenda book are must-haves for this meticulous bookworm. The Planner knows what she’ll read, when she’ll read it, and what flavor of ice cream she’ll be eating while doing so.

This reader spends the summer doing two things: reading books and talking about reading books. Whether it be recommending books to others, ranting about a recent disappointing read, or gushing about a new favorite, one thing is certain: you never have to worry about having nothing to talk about when this one is around!

This reader simply goes with the flow. They’re so easy-going and spontaneous that “TBR” isn’t even in their vocabulary. They read whatever and whenever suits their fancy without giving a second thought to numbers, page counts, genres, read-a-thons, reading challenges, recent releases, or the latest hyped books.

School might be out for most people, but not this ambitious reader! Whether or not classes are actually in session, this reader is determined to educate themselves by reading a meticulously chosen selection of books.

If you’re looking for this reader, the only places you need to check are ones within a few feet of water. This reader can always be found reading by the ocean, lake, or pool with some snazzy shades and a bottle of sunscreen nearby.

Though this reader is always on the go, she never forgets to bring a book along. You never know when you’ll have time to read while waiting for an appointment, on your lunch break, or even while standing in line at the store (not really, but how funny would that be?).

We’ve all been there: you’re reading in bed, nose-deep in a completely engrossing page-turner, when suddenly you see something outside of your bedroom window… is that DAWN?!?! This reader is perpetually staying up past her bedtime!

This bookworm isn’t just hungry for literature– she always has a snack nearby to crunch, slurp, or lick. Crumbs in the spine? Smears on the pages? That’s simply the price to pay for deliciousness!

This reader keeps up with all the most recent releases and latest bookish treads– and even sets some of her own! You can always rely on her to have the most up-to-date reading recommendations up her sleeve.

What kind of summer reader are you? (If you’re curious, I’m definitely a Planner and a Student at Heart.) Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday: FREEDOM!!

Happy Tuesday!! The lovely bloggers over at The Broke and the Bookish are taking a brief hiatus from hosting Top Ten Tuesday this summer, which means that I’ve decided to create some of my own TTT themes. Since today is Independence Day in the United States, I thought it would be fun to talk about books revolving around freedom. Though we might initially think of freedom as escaping from physical imprisonment or captivity, there are countless ways that freedom can be manifested. In no particular order, here are my Top Ten Books About Freedom:

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass by Frederick Douglass

This autobiography discusses one of the most important kinds of freedom, in my opinion: freedom from slavery. Douglass was a slave who escaped from bondage, traveled to New England, and became one of the most successful and influential African American orators of his time. His life story and his writing are as fascinating as they are inspirational.

The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster

I think we can all relate to the feeling of being trapped in a monotonous, dull routine. The Phantom Tollbooth offers young Milo a respite from this gloomy boredom and helps him realize that there is fun, adventure, and excitement to be found in everyday life. (It also features the most adorable dog!!)

Wild by Cheryl Strayed

As she hikes the grueling Pacific Crest Trail, Strayed is simultaneously on a journey to free herself from the regrets, mistakes, and sorrows of her past. What she finds is an illuminating sense of self, life, and purpose. This empowering emotional and spiritual freedom is incredibly inspiring to read about.

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

Atwood has created a brilliant, expertly crafted novel of what it feels like to live under an oppressive government that does not recognize the rights of women to their own bodies and lives. Offred, the protagonist, seeks freedom from the societal chains she is forced to bear. Not only is this simply a captivating story, but it contains an important message that we should remember in our own society today.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

Though very different in many ways, Huck and Jim are both searching for the same thing as they journey along the river: freedom from the restrictive, controlling civilization they are forced to live in. This is a classic case of nature vs. civilization, making the raft a kind of liminal space where the normal rules of society are bent.

1984 by George Orwell

In this classic dystopian novel, Orwell shows how difficult it can be to maintain individuality and assert one’s free will in the face of an all-knowing, omnipotent government. Though freedom from observance is sought, such efforts ultimately prove futile. This is one of the most unsettling, startling, eye-opening books I’ve ever read!

Beloved by Toni Morrison

Haunted by the ghosts of her past as a slave, Sethe is nearly driven to madness as her memories become more and more real. This raw, unsettling, captivating novel captures the struggle of trying to break free from the past, especially when remnants of it still surround you.

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

Sometimes adolescence can feel like one big cage built by society, arbitrary rules of “popularity,” the desire to conform and be liked, high expectations of adults, and all of the questions you wish you had answers for. Fortunately, Charlie finds some freedom from this cage through the help of some unlikely friends.

Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer

Krakauer tells the true story of a man named Chris McCandless who traveled across the United States all the way to Alaska where he unfortunately passed away in the middle of the wilderness. Though people wonder exactly what Chris wanted to get out of his journey, I personally feel as though he was searching for the freedom to live the life he wanted to live without feeling restricted by society.

1776 by David McCullough

How could I create a list about freedom without including a book about America’s independence from Great Britain? McCullough is a masterful historian and storyteller, as shown through his ability to tell this inspirational and engaging historical account.

 

What books remind you of freedom? What do you think of the books on my list? Do you have any fun Fourth of July traditions? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday: Best Books of 2017 (So Far)

Happy Tuesday!! Since we’re around halfway done with 2017 (eek!) it’s time to reflect on what I’ve read so far this year. Though my reading slowed to a near halt during the first few months of this year due to my busy semester at school, but it picked up significantly once I moved back home for the summer in May. (I’ve read SO MANY books since I’ve been home and it feels WONDERFUL.) Hosted by the lovely bloggers at The Broke and the Bookish, this week’s TTT theme is the Top Ten Best Books of 2017 (So Far). In no particular order, here are my favorites with some snippets of my thoughts from reviews I’ve written about them:

The Shining by Stephen King

From my review: Stephen King’s The Shining is a standout thriller in its attention to detail and incorporation of family dynamics, human nature, and the perspective of a child into a twisted, creepy story. Whether or not you’ve seen the movie adaptation or are a fan of thrillers in general, The Shining is one book that you must add to your TBR list!

Milk and Honey by Rupi Kaur

From my review: I bought a copy of Milk and Honey on a whim because I had heard a lot of great things about it. What I didn’t realize was that Rupi’s words would resonate so deeply with me and linger on in my mind long after I had read them. These poems are for anyone and everyone, regardless of whether or not you’ve read or enjoyed poetry in the past. Rupi Kaur has written poetry for human nature.

How to Ruin Everything by George Watsky

From my review: Reading this book felt like having the a random, hilarious, and well-spoken conversation with Watsky. How to Ruin Everything is definitely something I’ll be returning to in the future– for a laugh, for inspiration, and to be reminded that there’s nothing quite like the power of a good story.

As You Wish by Cary Elwes

From my review: Reading this memoir was such a fun, entertaining, and interesting experience. Not only did I learn a lot about Elwes and everything that went into making this movie, but my eyes were also opened to the entire film-making process in general. As You Wish is a must-read for any fan of The Princess Bride. Now all I want to do is re-watch the movie!

A Room with a View by E.M. Forster

From my review: A Room with a View is basically an English major’s dream novel. As I was reading I couldn’t help but think how many interesting papers could be written about it. You could discuss the entire concept of a “room with a view” and what that means, the contrast between the liminal space of the woods as opposed to the confines of the domestic sphere, the hierarchy of social classes, the portrayal of women and their role in society, the differences between Italy and England– the list goes on and on!

The Bridge of San Luis Rey by Thornton Wilder

From my review: The time period and setting and characters are so specifically and carefully crafted with tiny details, yet the story itself could really have taken place anywhere. This is a testament to the universality of this novel’s major themes and questions about life and death, a reflection of the fact that we all must face these issues at some point in our lives. The stories of these five individuals present a sort of microcosm of life in general, presenting the reader with different challenges and experiences that must be confronted eventually.

Death Comes for the Archbishop by Willa Cather

From my review: For me, the experience of reading  Cather novel is like coming home after months of being away: it’s familiar, refreshing, comforting, and sweetly nostalgic… reading Death Comes for the Archbishop has reaffirmed Cather as one of my favorite authors.

The Song of the Lark by Willa Cather

From my review: I was enthralled by this novel. Everything about it captivated me from the very first sentence to the very last word. In fact, I was enjoying it so much that I marked all of my favorite passages with sticky notes, only to realize halfway through that I would have to take them all out when I was finished (it was a library book).

{I forgot to take a photo of my library copy– whoops!}

Sartoris by William Faulkner

From my review: What has always stood out to me the most about Faulkner’s novels is how character driven they are in every sense. The plot seems almost secondary, as though all that really matters are the thoughts within and relationships between the characters. (And sometimes this is all we are ever given!) In some ways it feels like more happens in texts that are steered by characters rather than plot because we are always learning more about characters’ changing beliefs, values, and attitudes as the story progresses.

Matilda by Roald Dahl

From my review (scheduled): I really wish I had read this book when I was younger because I think Matilda’s character would have really resonated with me. Younger Holly would have been thrilled to read about a bookworm like myself who triumphed over obstacles against all odds. Matilda is such an important character for children to read about, both as a bookish hero as well as a strong, clever, independent female character.

What are the best books that you’ve read so far in 2017? What do you think of the books I’ve mentioned? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday: Series I Need to Finish

Happy Tuesday!! This week’s Top Ten Tuesday theme is technically about book series that I want to start; however, the more pressing issue on my mind is the fact that there are SO MANY series that I need to FINISH. Once again I’m going to break the TTT status quo and switch it up a little by sharing the Top Ten Series I Need to Finish. 

What series do you really need to finish? What do you think of the books that I’ve mentioned? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday: I Recommend Books to My Dad

Happy Tuesday!! Father’s Day is right around the corner, and the lovely bloggers over at The Broke and the Bookish are celebrating by dedicating this week’s Top Ten Tuesday theme to those delightful dads. Since I recently made a TTT list about my mom, I’ve decided to make this TTT list about my dad. Here are my recommendations of ten books I think my dad would really enjoy:

Wild by Cheryl Strayed

My dad is an avid hiker, but since we live in New England we’re much more familiar with the Appalachian Trail than the Pacific Crest Trail on the west coast that Cheryl hikes and talks about in this memoir. I think he would find this really interesting!

One More Thing by B.J. Novak

My dad has an awesome sense of humor, and so does B.J. Novak. Plus, these short stories are perfect for reading in small chunks of time since my dad is usually really busy. This is a book that can easily be picked up and put down again over a longer period of time (hence why I took nearly two years to read it!).

The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt

This book is SO LONG but very worth the time commitment it takes to read it. It’s such a unique, dark, intriguing story and I would love to hear my dad’s thoughts on it. It’s also written by an author who graduated from one of the colleges I initially applied to.

Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

Okay, I don’t actually know if he would enjoy this one because everyone but me seemed to hate it when I read it with my AP English class. But I know he really liked A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving and this classic reminds me of that book for some strange reason… maybe because of the younger protagonists?

And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

I’m recommending this book because a) I’m a firm believer that everyone should read this because it’s fantastic and b) I really want to know if he can predict who the murderer is! (Side note: I was SO WRONG with my prediction when I first read it!)

Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

He and my mom really enjoy watching the Hunger Games movies and I think he already read the first book in this trilogy, so the sequel would be a perfect summer read. It would also give me an excuse to make fiery summer puns (get it?).

1984 or Animal Farm by George Orwell

Talking about The Hunger Games made me think about darker, twisted versions of our own society—what better author to recommend than George Orwell? I would love to hear my dad thoughts on these novels, especially how they end.

Why I Write by George Orwell

While we’re already aboard the Orwell train, why not add another one? My dad is a great writer and he has to do a lot of it for his job, so I feel like he would find this both really interesting and really useful. It’s also fairly short, so it makes for a very quick read.

The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom

I have a feeling he might have already read this book (or maybe another book by this author) but I’m going to put it down anyways because I think it’s the kind of touching story that my dad would really appreciate.

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by Harry Potter

I’m recommending this purely because I feel like it will explain SO MANY of the references I make on a regular basis. (Also because it’s Harry Potter and literally everyone on this planet should read it.)

Happy (early) Father’s Day, dad! Thanks for being the best ❤

What books would you recommend to your dad? What do you think of the books on my list? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY