Books

WIDE SARGASSO SEA by Jean Rhys | Review

"Wide Sargasso Sea, a masterpiece of modern fiction, was Jean Rhys’s return to the literary center stage. She had a startling early career and was known for her extraordinary prose and haunting women characters. With Wide Sargasso Sea, her last and best-selling novel, she ingeniously brings into light one of fiction’s most fascinating characters: the… Continue reading WIDE SARGASSO SEA by Jean Rhys | Review

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Classic Couple

A Classic Couple: The Catcher in the Rye and The Perks of Being a Wallflower

When I realized recently that I have never made a Classic Couple pairing of J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye (1951) and Stephen Chbosky’s The Perks of Being a Wallflower (1999), I vowed to remedy that situation immediately. This classic/contemporary duo always reminds me of the start of the school year, which makes this the… Continue reading A Classic Couple: The Catcher in the Rye and The Perks of Being a Wallflower

Classic Couple

A Classic Couple: Romeo & Juliet and The Hunger Games

Sometimes it seems as though everyone is birthed from the womb with an inherent knowledge of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. I have a feeling that a similar situation will happen with Suzanne Collins' novel The Hunger Games in a few generations. Just as the mention of Shakespeare's famous play immediately conjures up ideas of star-crossed lovers and family feuds, The… Continue reading A Classic Couple: Romeo & Juliet and The Hunger Games

Classic Couple

A Classic Couple: Middlemarch and Nervous Conditions

A few months ago I discussed Tsitsi Dangarembga's 1988 novel Nervous Conditions in the context of feminist writing and postcolonial literature. Today, I'll like to talk about this remarkable novel in a slightly different context: coupled with George Eliot's classic 1871 novel Middlemarch. Published over a century apart and set against very different backdrops, these two novels are nevertheless tied… Continue reading A Classic Couple: Middlemarch and Nervous Conditions

Classic Couple

A Classic Couple: Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea

Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel Jane Eyre is one of the books that first made me fall in love with classic literature. I remember reading it on a family road trip before my senior year of high school, captivated by Jane's independence and resilience. For years librarians, professors, and bookish friends who know that Jane Eyre is a favorite of… Continue reading A Classic Couple: Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea

Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday: Festive 4th Covers {Bookstagram Edition!}

Happy Tuesday! And for all of my fellow Americans, happy Fourth of July Eve! (That's a holiday, right?!?) Today's Top Ten Tuesday topic (hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl) is Fourth of July themed, which means it's time to break out those red, white, and blue book covers. This week I've set myself a little challenge… Continue reading Top Ten Tuesday: Festive 4th Covers {Bookstagram Edition!}

Feminist Fridays

Feminist Fridays: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

I was thrilled that part of my postcolonial literature tutorial during my last term at Oxford was reading and writing about Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Fifteen years after the publication of her debut novel Purple Hibiscus in 2003, Adichie continues to make headlines today. Not only is she known as a renowned Nigerian novelist, but she has also made… Continue reading Feminist Fridays: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Classic Couple

A Classic Couple: The Lost World and Jurassic Park

Today I bring you a very specie edition of A Classic Couple featuring two remarkable books: The Lost World by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1912) and Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton (1990). You may be wondering what a novel by the creator of Sherlock Holmes has to do with the book that inspired my favorite movie. The answer? The Lost… Continue reading A Classic Couple: The Lost World and Jurassic Park

Classic Couple

A Classic Couple: Orlando and Every Day

It's time for another Classic Couple! I love this feature so much but for some reason it tends to be the last thing on my mind when scheduling posts. In an effort to be more regular about it in the future, today I'd like to share an interesting and unexpected pair: Virginia Woolf's novel Orlando (1928) and… Continue reading A Classic Couple: Orlando and Every Day

Feminist Fridays

Feminist Fridays: Postcolonial Literature & Tsitsi Dangarembga

First, I want to thank you all for being so receptive to my last Feminist Fridays post about postcolonial literature. I didn't expect there to be such resounding interest in this topic, but I'm so happy that there is! Today I'll be talking about a groundbreaking author who does not get nearly enough time in the spotlight as… Continue reading Feminist Fridays: Postcolonial Literature & Tsitsi Dangarembga