Feminist Fridays: Emily Dickinson

Today I'm going to talk about one of my favorite poets of all time: Emily Dickinson. Earlier this term I was assigned to read many, many poems by Dickinson for my Writing Feminisms tutorial, which felt more like reading for pleasure rather than reading to write an essay. After having done more research about her life and … Continue reading Feminist Fridays: Emily Dickinson

MEMORIAL by Alice Oswald | Review

In this daring new work, the poet Alice Oswald strips away the narrative of the Iliad—the anger of Achilles, the story of Helen—in favor of attending to its atmospheres: the extended similes that bring so much of the natural order into the poem and the corresponding litany of the war-dead, most of whom are little … Continue reading MEMORIAL by Alice Oswald | Review

Burns Night (and Haggis?!) | Holly Goes Abroad

A few days ago I had the pleasure of celebrating an interesting and hilariously fun tradition: Burns night. This Scottish tradition is typically celebrated on January 25th in honor of Robert Burns (1759-96), who is considered the national poet of Scotland. There were bagpipes, several toasts, many lines of poetry read in thick Scottish accents, and … Continue reading Burns Night (and Haggis?!) | Holly Goes Abroad

Feminist Fridays: Augusta Webster

This week I'll be discussing one of the Victorian poets I read for the first time last term: August Webster. Born as Julia Augusta Davies, August Webster (1837-1894) was a writer of all sorts: poems, essays, plays, translations, and even a novel. Although she started out studying Greek at home, she eventually got the opportunity … Continue reading Feminist Fridays: Augusta Webster

THE SUN AND HER FLOWERS by Rupi Kaur | Review

Recently I read this Guardian article by Priya Khaira-Hanks that speaks about the controversy surrounding Rupi Kaur as an "instapoet" who has supposedly lowered the bar when it comes to the quality of publishable poetry. Kaur's poetic style is often parodied with the intended implication being that anyone could write such simple, mundane lines. Despite … Continue reading THE SUN AND HER FLOWERS by Rupi Kaur | Review

Feminist Fridays: Christina Rossetti

Welcome to a new feature I'm trying out called Feminist Fridays, a weekly(wish) celebration of feminist texts, writers, and ideas. Studying English literature has made me realize how easy it is to get caught up in the male-dominated Western canon and completely miss the amazing work done by brilliant women over the years. Today I'll … Continue reading Feminist Fridays: Christina Rossetti

How Shakespeare Redefined Beauty (Sort Of) | Discussion

This semester I'm taking a Renaissance Poetry class, which can basically be summed up in two words: Shakespeare's sonnets. We've read much more than solely sonnets by Shakespeare, of course; however, he had such a remarkable influence on this poetic form that many of our class discussions of other poems ultimately circle back to the … Continue reading How Shakespeare Redefined Beauty (Sort Of) | Discussion

MILK AND HONEY by Rupi Kaur | Review

In the style of Rupi Kaur herself, I’ll do my best to make my review of Milk and Honey simple, short, and direct. Here are five reasons why this poetry collection is remarkable: PERSONAL, YET RELATABLE. It’s clear that many of these poems contain specific details from past relationships and personal experiences; however, she discusses … Continue reading MILK AND HONEY by Rupi Kaur | Review

Poevember: THE RAVEN

"Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary..." So begins one of Edgar Allan Poe's most famous works, "The Raven." This poem tells the tale of a man who is visited by a talking raven, who only speaks one unsettling word again and again. As the narrator gradually descends into insanity, the … Continue reading Poevember: THE RAVEN