Feminist Fridays: In which I GUSH about EVERYTHING I KNOW ABOUT LOVE by Dolly Alderton

Has this Feminist Fridays feature just turned into me talking about memoirs written by women? Maybe. Am I apologizing for it? ABSOLUTELY NOT. Today's post is just going to be absolutely gushing about how much I adored Dolly Alderton's Everything I Know About Love. Published in 2018, this memoir covers everything from growing up in the suburbs to parties, … Continue reading Feminist Fridays: In which I GUSH about EVERYTHING I KNOW ABOUT LOVE by Dolly Alderton

Feminist Fridays: Abbi Jacobson on women in the workplace, anxiety, and personal identity

I read Abbi Jacobson’s memoir I Might Regret This without knowing anything more about her other than what was in the biographical blurb on the back cover. One of my best friends read this book and then immediately recommended it to me and actually gave me her physical copy, which is how I knew she meant business. People … Continue reading Feminist Fridays: Abbi Jacobson on women in the workplace, anxiety, and personal identity

Feminist Fridays: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

I was thrilled that part of my postcolonial literature tutorial during my last term at Oxford was reading and writing about Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Fifteen years after the publication of her debut novel Purple Hibiscus in 2003, Adichie continues to make headlines today. Not only is she known as a renowned Nigerian novelist, but she has also made … Continue reading Feminist Fridays: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Feminist Fridays: Postcolonial Literature & Tsitsi Dangarembga

First, I want to thank you all for being so receptive to my last Feminist Fridays post about postcolonial literature. I didn't expect there to be such resounding interest in this topic, but I'm so happy that there is! Today I'll be talking about a groundbreaking author who does not get nearly enough time in the spotlight as … Continue reading Feminist Fridays: Postcolonial Literature & Tsitsi Dangarembga

Feminist Fridays: Postcolonial Literature, Feminism, and Unexpected Enthusiasm

As of this week I am halfway through my third and final term at Oxford, meaning that by this point I've done enough work to form a solid opinion about my Trinity tutorials. Today I'd like to talk about my unexpected enthusiasm for postcolonial literature and how feminist perspectives play a role in reading and … Continue reading Feminist Fridays: Postcolonial Literature, Feminism, and Unexpected Enthusiasm

Feminist Fridays: Pride and Prejudice (circa 1995 BBC)

Jane Austen's classic novel Pride and Prejudice, along with many of her other novels, often receives criticism for depicting women as utterly dependent on men. While I wholeheartedly disagree with this criticism (look at Austen's satire! her wit! her humor! making fun of those who depend on men!), today I'd like to discuss this perspective regarding a … Continue reading Feminist Fridays: Pride and Prejudice (circa 1995 BBC)

Feminist Fridays: Feminist Writing Tutorial

Now that Hilary term at Oxford has officially come and gone, I'm going to share my thoughts on the Feminist Writing tutorial I recently completed. This tutorial (basically what they call classes at Oxford) was an English course, but it also blended some feminist theory into the mix as well. It was nice to have … Continue reading Feminist Fridays: Feminist Writing Tutorial

Feminist Fridays: I wrote an entire essay about hair?

Yes, you read the title of this post correctly: I recently filled an entire eight pages with an essay about hair. Since it has a decidedly feminist perspective, I thought I would discuss it with you all in this week's installment of Feminist Fridays. For my English Literature 1910-Present tutorial I was asked to read Not So Quiet... by … Continue reading Feminist Fridays: I wrote an entire essay about hair?

Feminist Fridays: WOMAN AND LABOUR by Olive Schreiner

Fellow nerds, I am SO excited for today's installment of Feminist Fridays because I have the pleasure of discussing Olive Schreiner's fantastic work Woman and Labour. One of the many perks of being in a Writing Feminisms tutorial at Oxford is that I'm introduced to numerous writers that I had never heard of before. Olive Schreiner (1855-1920) … Continue reading Feminist Fridays: WOMAN AND LABOUR by Olive Schreiner

WHEN EVERYTHING CHANGED by Gail Collins | Review

When Everything Changed is an incredibly comprehensive account of how the role of women in society has changed throughout recent American history. Though I expected this book to have a certain level of detail in its research, I did not expect it to discuss this topic from such a wide variety of perspectives. Here the … Continue reading WHEN EVERYTHING CHANGED by Gail Collins | Review