Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday: Australian Reads

Happy Tuesday!! This week’s Top Ten Tuesday (hosted by That Artsy Reader Girl) is to share books set in another country; however, I’ve decided to mix it up a bit (when don’t I?). Instead, I’ll be sharing ten books that either take place in Australia or are written by Australian writers. Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta sparked me to make this list because it satisfies both of those qualities. Needless to say, I definitely need to read more Australian books!

What are some of your favorite books that take place in Australia or are written by Australian writers? Any recommendations? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

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Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday: Books I Could Reread Forever

Happy Tuesday!! I am so excited about this week’s Top Ten Tuesday topic because it features one of my absolute favorite parts about being a bookworm: rereading. I adore rereading my favorite books over and over and over again for countless reasons: the comforting familiarity, the brilliant writing, the characters that feel like old friends you haven’t spoken to in a while… the list goes on and on! It is my pleasure to share with you this list of ten books that I could reread forever. 

Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta

I know I mention this book all the time but that is certainly not going to stop me from highlighting it here! I’ve read this novel more times than I can count and each time I do I become invested in Taylor and Jonah’s story all over again. It contains everything I love: characters with depth, a boarding school setting, stories within stories, literary references, beautiful writing, and a plot twist at the end that I never saw coming.

The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien

I first read The Hobbit when I was in fifth grade and then continued on with the trilogy before the following summer was out. I love these books to pieces and they’ve played such an important role in shaping me into the avid reader that I am today. (Favorite of the bunch? Definitely Two Towers. For some reason I’ve always had a dear attachment to it!)

Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling

What would a list of rereads be without mentioning good old Harry Potter? I’m sure I’m not the only one who has featured this in their list this week. I’ve read many of the books a handful of times, although I can’t remember ever rereading Goblet of Fire now that I think about it…. (that’s my least favorite of the seven). I could definitely reread these books (and rewatch the movies) forever!

The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner

I reread this book for the first time last summer and was taken aback by how many new things I noticed. I’m now a firm believer that Faulkner is meant to be read more than once and I’m already looking forward to reading this brilliant, fascinating, bewildering novel again and again in the future. (The same goes for basically all of Faulkner’s works for me!)

The BFG by Roald Dahl

I was first read this adorable book by my fourth grade teacher in elementary school– and then again in fifth grade by the same teacher. Since then I’ve reread it once or twice and have loved it even more each time. Road Dahl is the master at creating timeless stories that captivate readers of all ages. There’s nothing like going back to this old favorite!

The Outcasts of 19 Schuyler Place by E.L. Konigsburg

I purchased my first and only copy of this book at a Scholastic book fair (I miss those so much!) when I was in third grade and I have read it nearly every summer since then. Not only is this simply an entertaining, clever summer camp story, but it’s also a novel about growing up and realizing that even adults don’t really know what they’re doing (what’s more liberating than that?!).

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

This is definitely one of those classics that never get old. There are countless fascinating ways to read and interpret this novel, from focusing on colors and other motifs to thinking about location, the American Dream, the role of women, prohibition, narrative voice– the list goes on and on! I’ve studied this in two different classes over the years and I honestly hope I get to study it again before undergrad is over.

Looking for Alaska by John Green

This may be John Green’s debut novel, but it remains my absolute favorite out of all the ones he has written. I love how the story seems so simple yet involves all of the complex and confusing emotions we each experience at one point or another. Besides, this novel has some of my favorite quotes in it!

And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

It’s generally rare for me to want to reread mystery novels once I know how they end; however, this book has always been the exception to that rule. This murder mystery is so cleverly executed that I never tire of tiptoeing around its twists and turns over and over again. (If anyone has seen the BBC mini series, I’d be really interested to hear what you think of it because I have yet to watch it!)

The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass by Frederick Douglass

I. Love. This. Text. I’ve written numerous papers about it for various classes over the years and Douglass’ story never ceases to amaze, inspire, and intrigue me. Douglass’ life story is as captivating as his writing is eloquent, making Narrative a text that I’ll undoubtedly return to again and again in the future.

What books could you endlessly reread? What do you think of the books on my list? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Tags

20 Questions Book Tag

It’s time for another tag! I’ve never done the 20 Questions Book Tag before, so this is an especially exciting one for me. Thanks so much to Jenna @ Bookmark Your Thoughts for tagging me!

1. How many books are too many books in a book series? 

I think it really depends on the series itself, but generally it takes an exceptionally great story to extend past the length of a trilogy in my opinion. One of my biggest pet peeves is when series drag on for books and books after the core of the story has been told.

2. How do you feel about cliffhangers? 

I love them! There’s nothing better than ending on a chapter with a cliffhanger that makes you want to keep reading until the very last page.

3. Hardcopy or paperback?

Definitely paperback! Not only are they cheaper to buy, but they’re also more comfortable to hold and easier to transport.

4. Favorite book?

This is such a difficult question! I think I’m going to have to go with The Two Towers by J.R.R. Tolkien since it’s my favorite book of my favorite series.

5. Your least favorite book? 

This is also a difficult question! I usually don’t give up on books once I start reading them, but one book that I just couldn’t get through is Dairy Queen by Catherine Gilbert Murdock. It was painfully cheesy!

6. Love triangles, yes or no? 

NO. I think love triangles are a really lazy way to create some sort of semblance of a plot.

7. The most recent book you just couldn’t finish?

I don’t often put down books once I’ve started reading them, so the last one I didn’t finish was probably Dairy Queen a few years ago.

8. A book you’re currently reading?

Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens. Unfortunately, it’s taking me a long time to read because other books keep distracting me. I’m hoping to finish it this weekend!

9. Last book you recommended to someone?

Probably How to Ruin Everything by George Watsky because I talk about it all the time.

10. The oldest book you’ve read? (Publication date) 

The Epic of Gilgamesh, which dates back to 2000 BC.

11. The newest book you’ve read? (Publication date)

Turtles All the Way Down by John Green, which was published on October 10, 2017.

12. Favorite author?

Another really difficult question! I have so many favorite authors, but at the moment I would have to go with William Faulkner. He’s such a fascinating writer!

13. Buying books or borrowing books?

Ideally: buying books. Realistically: borrowing books.

14. A book you dislike that everyone else seems to love? 

Anything by William Shakespeare. As you know if you’ve read this post, I’ve never been a huge fan of the Bard despite the fact that everyone else seems to be.

15. Bookmarks or dog-ears?

I prefer using bookmarks, though I have been known to dog-ear my own books to mark important quotes that I want to come back to. (I would never dog-ear someone else’s book, though!)

16. A book you can always reread?

Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta. I love it even more every time I come back to it.

17. Can you read while hearing music?

Yes! As long as it’s a song I already know and not something completely new. I’m usually pretty good at blocking out noise while I read.

18. One POV or multiple POV? (POV’ = Points of view)

I love reading books with multiple POVs as long as it’s done well. Otherwise, I would much prefer just sticking to one POV.

19. Do you read a book in one sitting or over multiple days? 

I LOVE reading books in one sittings if they’re short enough, but the vast majority of the books I read take me longer than a single day.

20. One book you read because of the cover.

So many! (I’m an awful impulse buyer in bookshops.) I remember buying The Silent History by Eli Horowitz, Kevin Moffett, and Matthew Derby because I thought the cover was so cool. It ended up being an okay novel, but not one that I would likely reread.

Thanks again to Jenna for tagging me!

What are your answers to these questions? What do you think of mine? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Classic Couple

A Classic Couple: Jane Eyre and Jellicoe Road

A while ago I made a post sharing some classic and contemporary pairs and since then I’ve been explaining each pair week by week. Today I’ll be delving deeper into one of my favorite classic couples: Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre and Melina Marchetta’s Jellicoe Road. As you likely already know by now from the countless times I’ve mentioned them on this blog, these are two of my favorite books. Now it’s time to compare them!

Protagonists || Despite the decades that separate them, there are actually many similarities between Jane Eyre and Taylor Markham. Both young women are independent, clever, and resilient. They’re also both orphans: Jane’s parents died of typhus while Taylor’s mother abandoned her at a Seven Eleven when she was eleven years old. The two girls end up being cared for by institutions (the Lowood Institution and the Jellicoe School). Both end up leaving their institutions eventually (though with varying degrees of success).

Love Interests || How could we not discuss Mr. Rochester and Jonah Griggs? Though these men seem disagreeable at first, they are actually sensitive and caring (can’t escape that romance trope!). Though their budding relationships are certainly dramatic at times, it’s nevertheless really fun to read about them.

Hidden Pasts || Jane and Taylor grapple with secrets from the past, both in their own lives and in those of others. Mystery appears early on in Jellicoe Road as Taylor reads the manuscript Hannah has been writing for years. Over time Taylor pieces together the sections that are written out-of-order; however, she doesn’t realize the full implications of the story until much later. For Jane, the mystery comes in the form of secrets she learns about Mr. Rochester’s past. It seems as though everyone has a little something to hide.

Personal Growth || The character development in Jane Eyre and Jellicoe Road is remarkable. We follow Jane as she matures from a little girl into a young woman and Taylor as she comes to understand her own identity and the person she wants to be. Not only are these women brave, resilient, and determined, but they are also kind, caring, and thoughtful by the end of these novels. Brontë and Marchetta didn’t sacrifice softness for strength, which is something I greatly admire.

What are your thoughts on these books? Are there any other books that share these qualities? Have any recommendations? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Tags

Disney Princess Sidekicks Book Tag

Nothing brings a smile to my face quite like a good Disney movie. Fortunately, this Disney Princess Sidekicks Book Tag blends together everything great about Disney AND books. Thanks so much to Eva @ Brilliantly Bookish for tagging me!!

Mushu from Mulan 

{The Comic Relief – Name your favorite hilarious character or your favorite comedy/funny book}

Anything by Roald Dahl is hilariously witty, but a recent favorite of mine is George’s Marvelous Medicine. The grandma is such a riot!

The Seven Dwarfs from Snow White

{Favorite Group/Ensemble}

Definitely Blue and her friends from The Raven Cycle by Maggie Stiefvater. Not only do they have amazing adventures together, but their personalities also balance each other out incredibly well. They certainly have their ups and downs, but that makes it all the more realistic.

Pascal from Tangled

{The loyal cheerleader chameleon – Name a book that started out one way but changed for you}

Dracula by Bram Stoker. The beginning in Count Dracula’s castle was great, but then the action and excitement suddenly stopped. I wish Dracula played a larger role in the novel!

Meeko from Pocahontas

{Pocahontas’s sly and sneaky raccoon friend – Name a plot twist that you did not see coming}

Many people say that they predicted the ending of We Were Liars by E. Lockhart, but I never saw it coming!

Flounder from The Little Mermaid

{Gentle with their princess but protective with everyone else – Name your favorite best friend in a novel}

Raffy from Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta. Taylor is so lucky to have her as a best friend!

Louis from The Princess and the Frog

{The Musical Bunch – Name a novel where music played a big part or made you want to sing its praises}

The Song of the Lark by Willa Cather. I love the way Willa Cather incorporates so much about music and performance in general in this lyrical novel.

Maximus from Tangled

{The obstacle in Flynn Rider’s way – Name a character that faces a lot of obstacles}

Mark from The Martian by Andy Weir. I definitely wouldn’t have been able to survive on Mars… major props to him for doing so well!

Hamish, Hubert, & Harris from Brave

{Favorite family dynamics in a novel}

Fairies from Sleeping Beauty

{The Advice Givers – Book that most impacted your life}

This is so hard!! I’m going to go with Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien because I have such a nostalgic attachment to it.

Hei Hei from Moana

{Name a character that steals the show}

Heathcliff from Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë. No other character in that novel can beat Heathcliff’s strangeness!

Gus & Jaq from Cinderella

{Opposites Attract – Name your favorite or worst opposite attracts pairing}

Since I’ve already mentioned Jellicoe Road once in this tag, I’m going to go with Westley and Princess Buttercup from The Princess Bride by William Goldman.

Okay, I’m curious: What’s your favorite Disney movie?? What are your answers to these questions? What do you think of mine? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday: Fictional Crushes

Happy Tuesday!! I hope you’ve all been having a lovely week. Today I’m here to do another Top Ten Tuesday, a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s theme is a fun one: fictional crushes! We all have those characters that we secretly wish were real, right? Time to share!

Harry from Harry Potter and the Sorcerors’s Stone by J.K. Rowling

Ah, the original book crush. Reading this series in second grade was probably the first time I had a fictional crush. (But it wouldn’t be the last!)

Jesse Tuck from Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt

I feel like this one sort of goes without explaining if you’ve read the book. So sweet! So kind! So enthusiastic!

Jonah Griggs from Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta

A thousand times yes. Is it a stereotypical tough-guy-is-actually-sweet trope? Yes. Does it matter? Absolutely not.

Gabriel Oak from Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy

Oh, Bathesheba. Though you couldn’t appreciate the thoughtful, loyal, hard-working guy right in front of you, the rest of us certainly could!

Westley from The Princess Bride by William Goldman

The movie might help a little bit with this one… but there’s no denying Westley’s bravery, wit, and devotion. Princess Buttercup is a lucky girl!

Turns out this list was more difficult to make than I expected… I guess the books I’ve been reading lately have been lacking in the crush department?

What are some fictional crushes that you’ve had? What do you think about the books that I’ve mentioned? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday: Middle School Me

Happy Tuesday!! This week’s Top Ten Tuesday theme is a throwback freebie, so I’ve decided to talk about some of my most tumultuous years: middle school. Though I loathed my middle school years, it was also when I read some of my favorite books. The following books are ones that I loved when I was twelve, thirteen, and fourteen years old. Cue the flashback!


Did anyone else have a dreadful middle school experience? What books did you love when you were in middle school? What do you think of the books that I’ve mentioned? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Bookish, Tags

What Cats Do | Book Tag

Cats are great. If I wasn’t allergic to cats you can bet that I would be getting one as soon as I lived somewhere without dogs that would torment it. Cats are independent, their purrs are adorable, and they have the prettiest eyes. Knowing my affection for cats, you can imagine how excited I was when I discovered the existence of the What Cats Do Book Tag. This tag was created by Kate @meltingpotsandothercalamitiesThanks so much to Zuky @ Book Bum for tagging me!!

Purr: As cats do this when they’re happy or relaxed, what is the book that makes you happiest or relaxed?

Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta. I reread this book almost every summer because it’s such a beautifully told story. I feel like I mention it in nearly every tag I do, but it honestly deserves all the recognition it can get!

Sleep: What is a book that put you to sleep or was just boring?

Last semester I took a course on Renaissance poetry and I’m looking forward to (hopefully) never having to do that again. Not only am I not really interested in that time period, but I just couldn’t take how sexist and repetitive the majority of those sonnets are.

Twitch while dreaming: Have you ever dreamt of a book you read?

YES. I vividly remember dreaming of Hogwarts and adventures with Harry and his friends when I first started reading and watching Harry Potter. I think it had something to do with getting Hedwig back after Draco Malfoy had stolen her…

Seems to play nice…until the claws are out!:  Which book had the biggest plot twist(s)?

Illuminae by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff. The end of this book literally made my jaw drop. I’ve been saying this for EONS, but I can’t wait to continue on with this series!

Cuddles: Which book character would you give a hug to?

Stanley Yelnats from Holes by Louis Sachar. I just feel like this kiddo could use a hug after everything he’s been through. Plus, he has one of the best names ever and I’m so jealous.

Catnip: What’s a book that made you have warm and fuzzy feels?

Why Not Me? by Mindy Kaling. I love Mindy’s books because they’re honest, hilarious, and always leave me with a new perspective. (Also, shout out to the adorable chapter about her friendship with B.J. Novak!)

Cat breeds: Your favorite book(s)?

One of my favorite books is My Ántonia by Willa Cather (whose grave site I recently visited!). Cather’s writing is beautiful and this story dives into some really interesting ideas about travel, nostalgia, and how we develop our own identities.

Getting the cat: How did you find your favorite book(s)?

In the case of My Ántonia, I was assigned to read it for a Cultural Diversity in American Literature class I took during my second semester of my freshman year of college. I LOVED that class, both because of the professor and the subject matter.

Being in places they shouldn’t: Least favorite cliché?

I think one of the most cliche tropes in books is the love triangle. I can’t even explain how much I dislike love triangles in any form, especially when they’re either the entire basis for the plot or completely unnecessary aspects of the plot. (Unfortunately, An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir is a great example of this latter point.)

The good old cardboard box: Most underrated book series?

I LOVED the Secret series by Pseudonymous Bosch when I was younger, but I only know a few other people who have read it. This series is incredibly clever, creative, and suspenseful!!

Thanks again to Zuky for tagging me! This was such a fun tag! It makes me want to get a cat so badly….

What are your answers to these questions? Do you have a cat? Are you more of a cat person or a dog person (or both!)? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Bookish

My Personal Canon | 2017

Recently Jillian @ To Begin with I Read Jane Eyre created a post about her own personal literary canon and requested that I do the same. The goal is to compose a list of books that have greatly influenced your life, that you consider to be your favorite books, etc. I think this is a really interesting idea because there are so many different variables involved. On what criteria do you decide which books to include? Do you focus solely on books that have had a positive influence on your life? How long should your list be? Canon formation in general is really fascinating, but that’s a topic for another day.

For now, here is what I consider to be my personal canon. Some of these books I’ve read more times than I can count, while others I’ve only had the pleasure of experiencing once. Some have shaped who I’ve grown to be since childhood, while others have influenced my much more recently. Nevertheless, all of these books are ones that I love wholeheartedly, that I would read again and highly recommend to others. You’ll likely recognize these as ones I talk a lot about on this blog! In no particular order, they are:

Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling

I don’t think this one needs much of an explanation. I first started this series when I was in second grade and in a way I don’t think I’ll ever be truly done with it completely. Even though I’ve certainly “finished” the series in the sense that I’ve read all seven books, I know that I’ll keep rereading it well into the future.

The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien

Again, this one doesn’t require much of an explanation. I’ve reread these books more times than I can possibly count and they played a huge role in shaping my reading tastes and interests in middle school. They’re books I return to again and again for comfort, reassurance, and entertainment alike.

The Outcasts of 19 Schuyler Place by E.L. Konigsburg

I vividly remember buying my first and only copy of this book at a Scholastic book fair when I was in third grade. (Did anyone else LOVE those things?!?!) Since then I’ve reread it nearly every summer and each time I discover something new. What was at first a simple summer camp story in my ten-year-old eyes has transformed into a story of family, history, creativity, and resilience. (And THIS is why rereading is both important and awesome!)

Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta

I’m sure it is absolutely no surprise to anyone in the slightest that this book has a spot in my personal canon. Words cannot express how much I LOVE this book. It’s the one book I always bring with me to college each semester and that I talk about incessantly on this blog. For the millionth time, PLEASE read this fantastic novel. ❤

Gone by Michael Grant

Interestingly, this book’s influence comes from the context in which I first read it: a lunchtime book club in seventh grade. Through avidly reading and following this series’ six books I met one of my best friends, actually met Michael Grant in person at a book-signing, and realized how social reading could be.

Looking for Alaska by John Green

In reality, this is more of a placeholder for all of John Green’s books, though Looking for Alaska is probably my favorite. As with Gone, the context surrounding these books has been just as influential in my life (if not more so) than the content of the books themselves. John and Hank Green have shaped my life in countless ways at a time when I needed it most (I’m looking at you, tumultuous middle school years).

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Reading this classic novel in my high school American literature class opened my eyes to the depth and breadth that symbolism could add to books. Though this symbolism is pretty obvious (colors, the green light, East and West Egg, the eyes, etc.) it nevertheless made me realize how interesting and fun analyzing literature with a critical eye could be.

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Ah, Jane Eyre. I adore this novel not for the romance, writing, or plot (though all aspects of this book are fantastic) but primarily for the character of Jane herself. She is strong, independent, witty, kind, determined, and resilient– everything that I aspire to be. I’ve only read this novel once; however, it has lingered in my mind with more clarity than most other books I’ve read since then. I can’t wait to read it again soon!

Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

I ADORED this book when I was assigned to read it for my AP English class senior year of high school (much to the annoyance of the majority of my peers, who didn’t share my enthusiasm). I love watching Pip grow over time and overcome all of the obstacles he has to face. Dickens’ writing is witty and captivating, and the plot twist at the end had me gasping in surprise. This is another one that I definitely have to reread in the near future!

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave by Frederick Douglass

Since reading this autobiography in my Intro to Literature class during my first semester of college I have written at least three papers about it and researched the critical reception of Douglass’ works in general. Something about Douglass’ life and use of language to transform himself in American society fascinates me like nothing else.

My Ántonia by Willa Cather

I read this for my Cultural Diversity in American Literature class during my second semester of college and have not been able to stop thinking about it since (I’m only slightly exaggerating here). The narrative is constructed brilliantly and I think it’s fascinating how we only ever see Ántonia through the lens of Jim’s narration. Since then I’ve read two of Cather’s other novels and am eagerly looking forward to reading more!

There are so many books that I could have included, but I think this is a solid look into the books that have had the greatest influence on me thus far. Thanks so much to Jillian for asking me to make a personal canon! I had such a great time forming this list and thinking about all of the amazing books I’ve had the pleasure of reading over the years.

What books would be in your personal canon? What are you thoughts on any of the books that I’ve mentioned? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Tags

Beauty and the Beast Book Tag

Ah, the movie that everyone has been talking about for what feels like ages. I have to admit that I was a bit hesitant to watch the new live-action version of Beauty and the Beast; however, I’m happy to report that I was pleasantly surprised. Of course, there were some parts that I definitely could have done without (how about that little time travel scene through the random magical book?!) but as a whole I thought it was pretty well done. Gaston and Lefou stole the show with their humor and chemistry, and I haven’t been able to stop the Beast’s song “Evermore” from playing over and over again in my mind. But don’t worry: the original animated version will always hold a special place in my heart. ❤

Today I’m here to share the Beauty and the Beast Book Tag! Thanks so much to Silanur @ Aloof Books for tagging me!! Without further ado, let’s get on with the questions. (In case you’re wondering, these awesome Beauty and the Beast graphics are from the original creator of the tag, Du Livre.)

A villain you can’t help but love.

I’m not sure if he is technically considered a villain or more of an anti-hero, but regardless I’m going to say Victor from Vicious by V.E. Schwab. I love Schwab shows us the softer, moral side of him, causing us to even question his villain status in the first place. He and Eli also concoct one of the most interesting evil schemes I’ve ever read about. As someone who regularly carries epi-pens around with them for allergy reasons, the thought of them being used to revive people from near death and give them superhuman powers is super fascinating to me.

Your OTP. 

As per usual, I’m going to answer this question by saying Taylor and Jonah from Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta. In the realm of fictional romantic relationships, theirs is one that strikes me as nearing the realm of realistic (obviously not entirely, but sort of close). Their relationship takes time to develop and there are plenty of ups and downs, just like in real life. Each time I reread this book (which, at this point, has been more times than I can reliably keep track of) I can’t help but eagerly root for them again and again even though I know how the story will end.

A character that’s destined for bigger things. 

Though there are a plethora of characters that fit this description, I’ve ultimately decided to go with Blue Sargent from The Raven Cycle by Maggie Stiefvater. Not only is Blue intelligent, determined, and hard-working, but she is also incredibly kindhearted and deserves to achieve her dreams in life. Whether those goals include attending college, exploring the world, starting a family, or all three, I hope she gets there. Fingers crossed that fictional life treats her well!

A book that makes you hungry. 

It might seem strange at first, but I’m going to say The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan. Even though the majority of this book discusses the many issues plaguing our modern-day food production industry, it nevertheless makes me want to chow down on some local veggies or freshly picked fruit. One thing’s for certain: it definitely doesn’t make me eager to swing into a McDonald’s drive-thru window any time soon!

Opposites attract. 

The first couple that popped into my mind when I read this prompt was Scarlett O’Hara and Rhett Butler from Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell, which I think is pretty fitting. Though they are both headstrong and have dynamic, bold personalities, they nevertheless come from very different positions in society. Hardly seem to agree on anything.

What books would you have chosen for this tag? What do you think of the books that I’ve mentioned? Most importantly, what did YOU think of the new Beauty and the Beast movie? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY