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The #NotAll Book Tag

Thanks so much to Norees @ No Reads Too Great for tagging me! Also, thanks to the Orangutan Librarian for creating this #notall book tag in the first place. This is such a fun idea for a tag, so let’s dive right in!

#NotAll Cover Changes || A cover change you liked

Normally I’m not a fan of cover changes that involve movie adaptations, but the new cover of Call Me By Your Name by André Aciman is perfect. I love how simple it is and how the solid blue background really make the people and the typography pop.

#NotAll Adaptations || An adaptation you love more than the book

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky. I enjoyed the book, but after watching the movie I knew it would be my favorite of the two. Not only was the film beautifully done, but the soundtrack is also incredible. I still listen to it years after having seen the film for the first time in theaters.

#NotAll Tropes || A trope you’ll never tire of seeing

BOARDING SCHOOLS. If you’ve been around this blog long enough, then you’re probably already aware of my adoration of books set at boarding schools, summer camps, etc. There’s just something about these kinds of settings that I love (lots of kids, little supervision, plenty of shenanigans, etc.).

#NotAll Insta-Love || You insta-loved this insta-couple

Usually I really dislike insta-love situations, but I couldn’t help rooting for Westley and Princess Buttercup from the very beginning of William Goldman’s The Princess Bride. I couldn’t think of a more stereotypically picturesque couple!

#NotAll Love Triangles || An example of a love triangle done well

This is a tricky one because I really dislike love triangles. Perhaps an exception would be Far From the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy, although I guess that novel technically involves a love square. 

#NotAll Parents || Bookish parents that actually parent

Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery. I listened to the audio book version of this beloved classic a few months ago for the first time and couldn’t help but adore Marilla and Matthew. How could you not after reading this adorable book?

#NotAll Villains || A villain you love

I think he technically counts as more of an anti-hero than a villain, but I’m still going to go with Victor from Vicious by V.E. Schwab. There’s just something about his wit and ambiguity that makes him fascinating to read and think about, even years after I read the book for the first time.

#NotAll Chosen Ones || A chosen one you can get behind

Sophie from Roald Dahl’s The BFG. I want to be chosen to hang out with the BFG! Pick me! Please?! (As you can probably imagine, this was Young Holly’s childhood dream.)

#NotAll Hyped Books || A hyped book that lived up to the acclaim

One of my worst bookish pet peeves is when a book is spoiled by unrealistically high expectations. Fortunately, Brave New World by Aldous Huxley lived up to all of the hype and more. Such a bizarre, hilarious, thought-provoking novel!

#NotAll *Insert Favorite Genre* || A book you’re not keen on from your favorite genre

It’s no surprise that I LOVE classic literature. However, I must admit that I simply do not enjoy reading Ernest Hemingway’s novels. There’s just something about his choppy, terse writing style that grinds my gears.

#NotAll *Insert Least Favorite Genre* || A book you liked from a genre you don’t often read

I’m not sure I actually have an answer to this question! I tend not to read anything from my least favorite genres, so I think I’ll have to pass!

What are your answers to these questions? What do you think of mine? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

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Jingle All the Way Book Tag

MERRY CHRISTMAS!! I can’t believe it’s finally here! To celebrate I’m going to answer some festive questions in the Jingle All the Way Book Tag, which was originally created by The Left Handed Book Lover. Thanks so much to Dani @ Perspective of a Writer for tagging me!!

JINGLE BELLS: A fun, lighthearted book

The Princess Bride by William Goldman? I love this entertaining, hilarious, captivating adventure story, especially the snarky narrator. I highly recommend the movie as well (this is one of the few cases in which the movie rivals the book for me!).

I SAW MOMMY KISSING SANTA CLAUS: A book with a scandalous romance

I don’t know if the relationships in Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights could necessarily be described as particularly “romantic” or “scandalous” per say, but they are certainly memorable!

I’LL BE HOME FOR CHRISTMAS: A book you are determined to reread

I always say that My Ántonia by Willa Cather is one of my absolute favorite books, but I’ve only read it once. I adore rereading books, so I definitely want to read this one again in 2018!

SANTA CLAUS IS COMING TO TOWN: Your most anticipated release of 2017

Definitely Turtles All the Way Down by John Green. I was hesitant at first because I was afraid of being disappointed by all of the hype surrounding his new release, but it actually exceeded all of my expectations.

SILENT NIGHT: A beautiful book that everyone knows

I’m not sure I would say that everyone knows the story of One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez, but everyone definitely should. The lyrical writing in this novel is stunning and the story itself is incredibly captivating.

WINTER WONDERLAND: A book with great world-building

Ah, there’s so many to choose from! I think that I’ll have to go with Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card. This science fiction series has some of the most interesting world-building I’ve ever read… come to think of it, I should definitely finish this series soon!

GO TELL IT ON THE MOUNTAIN: An under-hyped book that is so great you want to tell everyone about it 

I absolutely adored The Rook by Daniel O’Malley when I read it a few years ago but know very few people who actually talk about it. It’s fantastic! So good! Read it! Please!

I SAW THREE SHIPS: Favorite trilogy

Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien. This has been my favorite trilogy for a decade now and I can’t see that changing anytime soon! Unlike with most trilogies, my favorite book in LOTR is actually The Two Towers, the middle one.

RUDOLPH THE RED-NOSED REINDEER: A book with an underdog protagonist who rises up

Holes by Louis Sachar. How could you not want to root for poor Stanley Yelnats as he tries to survive his time at Camp Green Lake.

HAVE YOURSELF A MERRY LITTLE CHRISTMAS: A book that helped you get through troubling times

SO. MANY. I especially love reading The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien whenever I’m stressed or just need to be cheered up. As I explained recently in another book tag I definitely identify with Bilbo.

Thanks again to Dani for tagging me! I hope you all have a lovely holiday filled with family, friends, delicious food, carols, and fresh snow!

What are your answers to these questions? What’s your favorite holiday tradition? How was Christmas for you this year? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday: Bookish Settings I’d Love to Visit

Happy Tuesday!! Today’s Top Ten Tuesday topic set by the bloggers over at The Broke and the Bookish highlights the ten bookish settings we’d love to visit. At times it has felt like I have been living in a fictional setting for the past few months (shout out to Oxford for being so magical!), so I was very excited when I saw this topic on the list. I’ve tried to avoid mentioning the really obvious ones (AKA Hogwarts and Middle-earth) so hopefully these are a little more interesting. In no particular order, they are:

The Yorkshire Moors of Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

This is quite a realistic goal for me considering that I’m currently studying abroad in England. I would love to visit the beautiful rural backdrop of this tumultuous Victorian novel.

The forest in Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt

The forest in this charming little book sounds so idyllic and peaceful (plus there’s that beautiful magic spring!). I’d love to take a strong among the tall trees and have a chat with Winnie Foster.

Cabeswater in The Raven Boys by Maggie Steifvater

Another magical forest I’d love to visit (can you tell I have a thing for magical forests?!). Exploring it with Blue and her crew would be an added bonus!

The BFG’s home in The BFG by Roald Dahl

I would give anything to see the rows and rows of dream jars in the BFG’s cavern… and maybe try a snozzcumber or two while I’m at it! Little ten-year-old me was so jealous of Sophie’s adventures and friendship with the Big Friendly Giant.

Jurassic Park in Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton

Even though the park ends up being a total disaster, it would still be incredible to see such huge dinosaurs up close. Besides, who doesn’t want to cruise around in those fun jeeps?

The circus in The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern

Confession: I’ve never been to a circus before. I feel like the amazing, whimsical, fantastic circus of this novel would be an incredible first circus experience… and a very overwhelming one!

The towers in The Outcasts of 19 Schuyler Place by E.L. Konigsburg

I’ve read this book so many times, but I can never quite imagine precisely what the towers in the garden might look like with all of their different pieces and parts. I would love to finally see them for myself!

The Lands Beyond in The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster

I would go to the Lands Beyond just for the sake of the amazing puns and wordy cleverness (and also Tock, the watchdog). It sounds like the ultimate destination for an English major!

Florin in The Princess Bride by William Goldman

Rolling hills? Looming cliffs? Fire swamps? (Minus the scary R.O.U.S. of course.) Sign me up! I would love to visit the amazing landscape of Florin (especially with Westley by my side…).

Outer space in The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

Adams makes me want to achieve my childhood dream of being an astronaut (although it probably wouldn’t be as hilarious as he makes it out to be!).

What bookish settings would you love to visit? What do you think of the ones I’ve mentioned? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Tags

Disney Princess Sidekicks Book Tag

Nothing brings a smile to my face quite like a good Disney movie. Fortunately, this Disney Princess Sidekicks Book Tag blends together everything great about Disney AND books. Thanks so much to Eva @ Brilliantly Bookish for tagging me!!

Mushu from Mulan 

{The Comic Relief – Name your favorite hilarious character or your favorite comedy/funny book}

Anything by Roald Dahl is hilariously witty, but a recent favorite of mine is George’s Marvelous Medicine. The grandma is such a riot!

The Seven Dwarfs from Snow White

{Favorite Group/Ensemble}

Definitely Blue and her friends from The Raven Cycle by Maggie Stiefvater. Not only do they have amazing adventures together, but their personalities also balance each other out incredibly well. They certainly have their ups and downs, but that makes it all the more realistic.

Pascal from Tangled

{The loyal cheerleader chameleon – Name a book that started out one way but changed for you}

Dracula by Bram Stoker. The beginning in Count Dracula’s castle was great, but then the action and excitement suddenly stopped. I wish Dracula played a larger role in the novel!

Meeko from Pocahontas

{Pocahontas’s sly and sneaky raccoon friend – Name a plot twist that you did not see coming}

Many people say that they predicted the ending of We Were Liars by E. Lockhart, but I never saw it coming!

Flounder from The Little Mermaid

{Gentle with their princess but protective with everyone else – Name your favorite best friend in a novel}

Raffy from Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta. Taylor is so lucky to have her as a best friend!

Louis from The Princess and the Frog

{The Musical Bunch – Name a novel where music played a big part or made you want to sing its praises}

The Song of the Lark by Willa Cather. I love the way Willa Cather incorporates so much about music and performance in general in this lyrical novel.

Maximus from Tangled

{The obstacle in Flynn Rider’s way – Name a character that faces a lot of obstacles}

Mark from The Martian by Andy Weir. I definitely wouldn’t have been able to survive on Mars… major props to him for doing so well!

Hamish, Hubert, & Harris from Brave

{Favorite family dynamics in a novel}

Fairies from Sleeping Beauty

{The Advice Givers – Book that most impacted your life}

This is so hard!! I’m going to go with Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien because I have such a nostalgic attachment to it.

Hei Hei from Moana

{Name a character that steals the show}

Heathcliff from Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë. No other character in that novel can beat Heathcliff’s strangeness!

Gus & Jaq from Cinderella

{Opposites Attract – Name your favorite or worst opposite attracts pairing}

Since I’ve already mentioned Jellicoe Road once in this tag, I’m going to go with Westley and Princess Buttercup from The Princess Bride by William Goldman.

Okay, I’m curious: What’s your favorite Disney movie?? What are your answers to these questions? What do you think of mine? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday: Fictional Crushes

Happy Tuesday!! I hope you’ve all been having a lovely week. Today I’m here to do another Top Ten Tuesday, a weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. This week’s theme is a fun one: fictional crushes! We all have those characters that we secretly wish were real, right? Time to share!

Harry from Harry Potter and the Sorcerors’s Stone by J.K. Rowling

Ah, the original book crush. Reading this series in second grade was probably the first time I had a fictional crush. (But it wouldn’t be the last!)

Jesse Tuck from Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt

I feel like this one sort of goes without explaining if you’ve read the book. So sweet! So kind! So enthusiastic!

Jonah Griggs from Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta

A thousand times yes. Is it a stereotypical tough-guy-is-actually-sweet trope? Yes. Does it matter? Absolutely not.

Gabriel Oak from Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy

Oh, Bathesheba. Though you couldn’t appreciate the thoughtful, loyal, hard-working guy right in front of you, the rest of us certainly could!

Westley from The Princess Bride by William Goldman

The movie might help a little bit with this one… but there’s no denying Westley’s bravery, wit, and devotion. Princess Buttercup is a lucky girl!

Turns out this list was more difficult to make than I expected… I guess the books I’ve been reading lately have been lacking in the crush department?

What are some fictional crushes that you’ve had? What do you think about the books that I’ve mentioned? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Tags

Summer Book Tag

Summer is pretty much over, but that won’t stop me from wrapping up the season with the Summer Book Tag. Thanks so much to Mischenko @ Read, Rant, Rock & Roll for tagging me!!

What book cover makes you think of summer?

One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez. I read this novel last summer and it is one of the most lyrical, seamless, beautifully written books I have ever read.

What book has brightened your day?

The Tale of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo was one of my favorite books when I was younger. I remember reading it over and over again because a) mice used to be by favorite animals and b) this story is captivating, charming, and creative.

Find a book cover with yellow on it.

Just look at that cute little yellow chick! I read Flipped by Wendelin Van Draanen a few weeks ago and loved it. I can’t even explain to you how heart-warming, poignant, hilarious, and brilliant this book is. I definitely wish I had read it sooner!

What action book had you running for the ice cream man?

The Princess Bride by William Goldman is equal parts hilarious, romantic, and action-packed. No matter what you’re in the mood to read, chances are that this book will fulfill it!

(Sunburn) What book has left you with a bad and/or painful ending?

I won’t spoil the ending in case you haven’t yet read The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, but it’s pretty devastating.

(Sunset) what book gave you the happiest feelings when it ended? 
I desperately hoped for at least a moderately happy ending for Jane (given her circumstances) and Charlotte Brontë didn’t disappoint!

What book cover reminds you of a sunset?

Look at that literal sunset on the cover. This old edition of The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton made this question easy!

What is one book or series you hope to read this summer?

I actually didn’t read any full series this summer… it was a summer of standalones, I guess!

Since summer has pretty much come to an end, I’m not going to tag anyone specifically… unless you would like to do it, then by all means GO FOR IT!

Is summer your favorite season or do you prefer autumn/winter (like me!)? What’s your favorite thing about summer? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Books

AS YOU WISH by Cary Elwes | Review

As you could probably tell from my review of William Goldman’s The Princess Bride, I’m a huge fan of both the novel and movie adaptation. Eager for more of this fantastic story, I recently turned to Cary Elwes’ book As You Wish in order to satisfy my fantasy-adventure-romance-comedy cravings. (I really don’t know how else to describe the story of The Princess Bride in general– it’s sort of a mix of every genre ever.) Filled with funny stories of cast members and fun facts about the making of the movie, this memoir is truly a one-of-a-kind reading experience for any Westley and Buttercup fan.

Elwes tells the story of his involvement in making the movie The Princess Bride chronologically from when he was first casted for the role of Westley to the movie’s twenty-fifth anniversary in 2012. He includes quotes from numerous cast members, offering different perspectives and insights on the moments and memories he mentions. It’s interesting to hear everyone’s thoughts on the same experiences as well as their feelings towards Elwes in general. For me, the inclusion of these perspectives encapsulates the close-knit the community of cast members that the production of this movie created.

It was also interesting to learn that they didn’t think the movie would ever be as successful as we know it to be today. According to Elwes, the producers were merely hoping that they could do the popular novel justice, especially since it was William Goldman’s favorite work that he had written. Many of the people involved with the making of the movie were fond of the novel (Elwes had grown up reading and enjoying it as one of his favorite books), meaning that dozens of people were invested in making the film the best it could possibly be. Their dedication to this movie became incredibly apparent to me when reading how much time and effort Elwes and Mandy Patinkin put into training for the famous duel scene. It’s no wonder that it looks so amazing!

My favorite aspect of this book was the nostalgic feeling it filled me with as I was reading it. Elwes writes with a very nostalgic tone in general, which makes it difficult not to invite that warm and fuzzy sensation into your stomach. It’s obvious that acting as Westley in this movie left a lasting positive impression on Elwes and undoubtedly influenced the rest of this life. His enthusiasm and love of The Princess Bride is contagious and reminded me of why I love the movie as well: the community surrounding it. Sure, the movie itself is hilarious, brilliant, and captivating, but the viewing experience brightens considerably when watched with friends.

My only complaint is that this memoir did seem a bit artificial and forced at times. Elwes offered so much praise of the directors, producers, and other cast members that it seemed as though a third of book was him trying to please and thank as many people as possible. While that is certainly an admirable goal, I think there is a different time and place for such an endeavor. If the book is intended for an audience composed mainly of fans, then it should focus on sharing the stories and experiences that the fans really want to read about. An acknowledgments section at the beginning or end of a book is the perfect place to express gratitude and praise those involved with the making of this incredible movie– much more effective than constantly peppering the rest of the book with random rambles of recognition.

Overall,  reading this memoir was such a fun, entertaining, and interesting experience. Not only did I learn a lot about Elwes and everything that went into making this movie, but my eyes were also opened to the entire filmmaking process in general. As You Wish is a must-read for any fan of The Princess Bride. Now all I want to do is rewatch the movie!

Rating: :0) :0) :0) :0) 4 out of 5 smileys

Would I recommend it to a friend?: Yes! Especially to those who love the movie The Princess Bride.

What are your thoughts on this book? Do you like The Princess Bride? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Monthly Wrap-Up

MARCH 2017 | Wrap-Up

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Ah, March: the green month of transition from winter to spring in which we all experience a sort of underlying current of excited anticipation… no? Just me? March has always seemed like one of those “in-between” months to me, standing alongside May and November as the chaotic calm before the storm of the months to come (if chaos can even be considered placid?). Regardless of how you feel about March, it’s time to once again say goodbye with another monthly wrap-up.

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In March I read a total of 5 books:

  1. How to Ruin Everything by George Watsky
  2. As You Wish by Cary Elwes
  3. The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl Beats Up the Marvel Universe by Ryan North & Erica Henderson
  4. Bayou Folk and A Night in Acadie by Kate Chopin
  5. A Room with a View by E.M. Forster

I read some fantastic books this month, but heads above them all was How to Ruin Everything by George Watsky. This collection of personal essays was incredibly engaging, hilarious, and thought-provoking. One of the reasons I loved it so much is that it made me think about some of the quirky, unexpected experiences in my own life. Sometimes it can be easy to forget that there isn’t just one right path that everyone follows– for some, life can involve smuggling narwhal tusks across the border and getting in trouble for aggressively rapping at a teacher (true story– read the book!). Whether or not you’re a fan of Watsky’s music (which you should be), I highly recommend reading How to Ruin Everything. 

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Good old spring break– could you hear the relieved sighs of thousands of college students in mid-March? I spent my spring break reading, blogging, and reading sonnets for my Renaissance Poetry class (SO. MANY. SONNETS.). It was great to spend some time at home with family and friends, especially after enduring midterms the week before. Transitioning back to campus was a little difficult, but we’re all finally back in the swing of things now.

The highlight of this month was definitely when I went to New York City with some of my friends. We spent the day roaming around the Metropolitan Museum of Art (the Met), which I had never been to before this trip.

I’m not going to lied, I was fairly overwhelmed by the sheer amount of art that is in this museum, as well as the size of the museum itself. We spent hours meticulously combing through each exhibit, but even then I felt as though there was so much I was missing because there simply wasn’t enough time to look at everything. I loved seeing the painting of George Washington crossing the Delaware (which is also HUGE) as well as one of the paintings they have by Claude Monet (probably my favorite painter). We also had a great time posing next to a bunch of the statues on display, as you can probably tell from the picture to the left.

I love going to museums and definitely wish that I had the opportunity to visit them more frequently. Fortunately, I’ve been lucky enough this semester to be able to visit two museums, which is more than I typically get around to visiting in a single year. If you ever get the chance to visit the Met, I highly recommend going– it’s amazing!

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Here are some notable posts from my blog this past month:

Here are some posts that I loved reading this month (there were SO MANY!!):

How was your month of March? What was the best book you read? Did you do anything really fun or exciting? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday: Best Books of 2016

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Happy Tuesday!! Can you believe that 2016 has almost come to a close? It feels like it was New Year’s Day just yesterday, yet here we are as 2017 fast approaches. I’ve been fortunate to have read a plethora of fantastic books this past year, so narrowing down a list of my Top Ten Best Books of 2016 was no easy feat. Nevertheless, here are the best books I’ve read in 2016 in the order that I read them:

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What are some of the best books that you read in 2016? What do you think of the books on my list? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday: Books to Buy for the College Student in Your Life

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Happy Tuesday! The holiday season is fast approaching, which means it’s time for The Broke and the Bookish’s holiday gift guide freebie week! Since I’m currently a college student, I thought I would share some of my expertise about this terrifying, tumultuous, and exciting time of life in the form of the Top Ten Books to Buy for the College Student in Your Life. Let the festive spirit commence!

is everyone hanging out without me coverIs Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? by Mindy Kaling

I feel like I have included this book on countless Top Ten Tuesday lists, but I just can’t help but mention it once more. When I read this collection of personal essays I was inspired by Kaling’s wit, wisdom, and perseverance in the face of numerous obstacles throughout her life. Besides, it’s a hilarious book that’s perfect for getting you to laugh in the midst of stressful final exams!

17802957A Little History of Literature by John Sutherland

What can I say? I’m an English major and a sucker for any book that discusses how literature evolves over time. This book is a concise, well-written, and fascinating read for anyone interested in how the literature we read today came to be. It also helps with adding books to your TBR list (which is both a good and bad thing at the rate that mine is currently growing!).

3109The Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan

Let’s face it: us college students are not always the healthiest of eaters. Not only is this book often discussed in college classes (I’ve talked about it in three of mine so far, and it wasn’t even assigned for the class!), but is also contains really interesting and eye-opening information about where our food comes from. It might not make you change what you eat completely, but it will definitely make you think twice about some of the food on your plate!

438353-2The Princess Bride by William Goldman

Though living with friends on campus and being able to study what you’re passionate about is an amazing experience, college can also be an incredibly stressful and scary time. We all could use a good laugh now and then, and The Princess Bride is the perfect medicine! Plus, you can also watch the movie adaptation after you read the book for double to hilarity.

The_BFG_(Dahl_novel_-_cover_art)The BFG by Roald Dahl

I don’t know about other college students out there, but I’m often hit with waves of homesickness and nostalgia while living away from my family back home. Any childhood favorite would fit on this list, but The BFG is my personal go-to pick-me-up whenever I’m feeling down. I mean, just look at that Big Friendly Giant’s adorable ears! They never fail to make me smile.

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger converThe Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

Sometimes we just need to know that someone else understands what it feels like to be a frustrated teenager. Look no further than Holden Caulfield, folks! Though some people think he is unbearably irritating, I’ve had a soft spot for him ever since first reading this novel in English during my freshman year of high school. If nothing else, it will certainly cause those high school memories to come rushing back!

the opposite of loneliness coverThe Opposite of Loneliness by Marina Keegan

Written by a college student who died in a tragic accident, this collection of short stories and essays will make you think, laugh, and want to pick up a pen and write some of your own. I felt a connection with Marina while reading this book, as though she understood what it felt like to be young and confused but determined to push onward.

1984 cover1984 by George Orwell

There’s nothing like this terrifying, disturbing, unsettling dystopia novel to open your eyes to what the future could look like if we let it– and perhaps what the present is already beginning to resemble in some ways. 1984 is perhaps one of the best fictional wake-up calls or warnings that could possibly be delivered. (Orwell’s Animal Farm would also work for this!)

fangirl coverFangirl by Rainbow Rowell

If you’ve read Fangirl, then it’s pretty obvious why it’s the perfect addition to this list. Cath and Wren’s experiences as freshmen in college did wonders to ease my fears about what college would be like. I think it would be so fun to reread this since I’m now a sophomore in college! Oh, how times have changed…

the hobbit coverThe Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

I’ve read this book so many times that I honestly cannot give a specific number. Besides being a captivating and entertaining story, The Hobbit carries an important lesson that college students (and everyone else, really)  can benefit from reading: Though the road is long and there’s an uphill climb at the end, eventually it will all be worth it. Don’t give up!

What books would you buy for a college student? What do you think of the books on my list? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY