Top Ten Tuesday: I Recommend Books to My Dad

Happy Tuesday!! Father’s Day is right around the corner, and the lovely bloggers over at The Broke and the Bookish are celebrating by dedicating this week’s Top Ten Tuesday theme to those delightful dads. Since I recently made a TTT list about my mom, I’ve decided to make this TTT list about my dad. Here are my recommendations of ten books I think my dad would really enjoy:

Wild by Cheryl Strayed

My dad is an avid hiker, but since we live in New England we’re much more familiar with the Appalachian Trail than the Pacific Crest Trail on the west coast that Cheryl hikes and talks about in this memoir. I think he would find this really interesting!

One More Thing by B.J. Novak

My dad has an awesome sense of humor, and so does B.J. Novak. Plus, these short stories are perfect for reading in small chunks of time since my dad is usually really busy. This is a book that can easily be picked up and put down again over a longer period of time (hence why I took nearly two years to read it!).

The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt

This book is SO LONG but very worth the time commitment it takes to read it. It’s such a unique, dark, intriguing story and I would love to hear my dad’s thoughts on it. It’s also written by an author who graduated from one of the colleges I initially applied to.

Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

Okay, I don’t actually know if he would enjoy this one because everyone but me seemed to hate it when I read it with my AP English class. But I know he really liked A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving and this classic reminds me of that book for some strange reason… maybe because of the younger protagonists?

And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

I’m recommending this book because a) I’m a firm believer that everyone should read this because it’s fantastic and b) I really want to know if he can predict who the murderer is! (Side note: I was SO WRONG with my prediction when I first read it!)

Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

He and my mom really enjoy watching the Hunger Games movies and I think he already read the first book in this trilogy, so the sequel would be a perfect summer read. It would also give me an excuse to make fiery summer puns (get it?).

1984 or Animal Farm by George Orwell

Talking about The Hunger Games made me think about darker, twisted versions of our own society—what better author to recommend than George Orwell? I would love to hear my dad thoughts on these novels, especially how they end.

Why I Write by George Orwell

While we’re already aboard the Orwell train, why not add another one? My dad is a great writer and he has to do a lot of it for his job, so I feel like he would find this both really interesting and really useful. It’s also fairly short, so it makes for a very quick read.

The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom

I have a feeling he might have already read this book (or maybe another book by this author) but I’m going to put it down anyways because I think it’s the kind of touching story that my dad would really appreciate.

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by Harry Potter

I’m recommending this purely because I feel like it will explain SO MANY of the references I make on a regular basis. (Also because it’s Harry Potter and literally everyone on this planet should read it.)

Happy (early) Father’s Day, dad! Thanks for being the best ❤

What books would you recommend to your dad? What do you think of the books on my list? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

My Personal Canon | 2017

Recently Jillian @ To Begin with I Read Jane Eyre created a post about her own personal literary canon and requested that I do the same. The goal is to compose a list of books that have greatly influenced your life, that you consider to be your favorite books, etc. I think this is a really interesting idea because there are so many different variables involved. On what criteria do you decide which books to include? Do you focus solely on books that have had a positive influence on your life? How long should your list be? Canon formation in general is really fascinating, but that’s a topic for another day.

For now, here is what I consider to be my personal canon. Some of these books I’ve read more times than I can count, while others I’ve only had the pleasure of experiencing once. Some have shaped who I’ve grown to be since childhood, while others have influenced my much more recently. Nevertheless, all of these books are ones that I love wholeheartedly, that I would read again and highly recommend to others. You’ll likely recognize these as ones I talk a lot about on this blog! In no particular order, they are:

Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling

I don’t think this one needs much of an explanation. I first started this series when I was in second grade and in a way I don’t think I’ll ever be truly done with it completely. Even though I’ve certainly “finished” the series in the sense that I’ve read all seven books, I know that I’ll keep rereading it well into the future.

The Hobbit and Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien

Again, this one doesn’t require much of an explanation. I’ve reread these books more times than I can possibly count and they played a huge role in shaping my reading tastes and interests in middle school. They’re books I return to again and again for comfort, reassurance, and entertainment alike.

The Outcasts of 19 Schuyler Place by E.L. Konigsburg

I vividly remember buying my first and only copy of this book at a Scholastic book fair when I was in third grade. (Did anyone else LOVE those things?!?!) Since then I’ve reread it nearly every summer and each time I discover something new. What was at first a simple summer camp story in my ten-year-old eyes has transformed into a story of family, history, creativity, and resilience. (And THIS is why rereading is both important and awesome!)

Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta

I’m sure it is absolutely no surprise to anyone in the slightest that this book has a spot in my personal canon. Words cannot express how much I LOVE this book. It’s the one book I always bring with me to college each semester and that I talk about incessantly on this blog. For the millionth time, PLEASE read this fantastic novel. ❤

Gone by Michael Grant

Interestingly, this book’s influence comes from the context in which I first read it: a lunchtime book club in seventh grade. Through avidly reading and following this series’ six books I met one of my best friends, actually met Michael Grant in person at a book-signing, and realized how social reading could be.

Looking for Alaska by John Green

In reality, this is more of a placeholder for all of John Green’s books, though Looking for Alaska is probably my favorite. As with Gone, the context surrounding these books has been just as influential in my life (if not more so) than the content of the books themselves. John and Hank Green have shaped my life in countless ways at a time when I needed it most (I’m looking at you, tumultuous middle school years).

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

Reading this classic novel in my high school American literature class opened my eyes to the depth and breadth that symbolism could add to books. Though this symbolism is pretty obvious (colors, the green light, East and West Egg, the eyes, etc.) it nevertheless made me realize how interesting and fun analyzing literature with a critical eye could be.

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Ah, Jane Eyre. I adore this novel not for the romance, writing, or plot (though all aspects of this book are fantastic) but primarily for the character of Jane herself. She is strong, independent, witty, kind, determined, and resilient– everything that I aspire to be. I’ve only read this novel once; however, it has lingered in my mind with more clarity than most other books I’ve read since then. I can’t wait to read it again soon!

Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

I ADORED this book when I was assigned to read it for my AP English class senior year of high school (much to the annoyance of the majority of my peers, who didn’t share my enthusiasm). I love watching Pip grow over time and overcome all of the obstacles he has to face. Dickens’ writing is witty and captivating, and the plot twist at the end had me gasping in surprise. This is another one that I definitely have to reread in the near future!

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave by Frederick Douglass

Since reading this autobiography in my Intro to Literature class during my first semester of college I have written at least three papers about it and researched the critical reception of Douglass’ works in general. Something about Douglass’ life and use of language to transform himself in American society fascinates me like nothing else.

My Ántonia by Willa Cather

I read this for my Cultural Diversity in American Literature class during my second semester of college and have not been able to stop thinking about it since (I’m only slightly exaggerating here). The narrative is constructed brilliantly and I think it’s fascinating how we only ever see Ántonia through the lens of Jim’s narration. Since then I’ve read two of Cather’s other novels and am eagerly looking forward to reading more!

There are so many books that I could have included, but I think this is a solid look into the books that have had the greatest influence on me thus far. Thanks so much to Jillian for asking me to make a personal canon! I had such a great time forming this list and thinking about all of the amazing books I’ve had the pleasure of reading over the years.

What books would be in your personal canon? What are you thoughts on any of the books that I’ve mentioned? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

The Captain America Book Tag

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A while ago I saw the Captain America Book Tag on Bookmark Lit and even though I wasn’t specifically tagged I knew I would have to do it eventually. Captain America is by far my favorite Marvel Avenger and the fact that this tag blends this amazing hero with books makes me want to give Morgan @ Gone with the Words, the creator of this book tag, a standing ovation.

Without further ado, let’s start the tag!

Great ExpectationsSteve Rogers/Captain America: a book with a big character transformation

Pip from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens is just one of the many characters in this classic novel that undergoes a massive amount of character development over the course of the story. They don’t call it a bildungsroman for nothing!

18405Peggy Carter: a book with a strong female protagonist

If it’s a strong, independent, determined, headstrong female protagonist you want, then look no further than Scarlett O’Hara from Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell. Though she can be stubborn, rash, and melodramatic, there’s no doubting her incredible strength in the face of poverty, death, and heartbreak.

The Raven King by Maggie StiefvaterBucky Barnes: a book with your ultimate BROTP

The Raven Cycle by Maggie Stiefvater is oozing with BROTPs galore. You can always count on Maggie Stiefvater to write adorable, relatable, and enviable friendships in general. (Honestly, just one of countless reasons to read this fantastic series!)

looking for alaskaHowling Commandos: a book with squad goals

Miles’ eclectic group of friends has always been one of the many reasons why I love Looking for Alaska by John Green. They have so much fun with their wacky adventures and it’s clear that they really care for and support one another, as all good friends should.

pride and prejudice cover 2Red Skull: a book with a cliché plot

I’m not going to lie: at this point, so many people have copied her that the plot of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice seems pretty cliché nowadays. Of course, we can’t really blame her for this– it has been centuries since it was written, after all!

23732096-2Natasha Romanoff: a book with a snarky side character

Nancy from The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl by Ryan North & Erica Henderson is the ultimate snark side character. She’s smart, has a hilarious dry sense of humor, and is always ready with a quick quip or two to liven things up.

When We CollidedSam Wilson: a book with a friendship meet cute.

When We Collided by Emery Lord is filled with adorable moments, but one of the cutest is when John and Vivi first meet at the pottery shop. Their cuteness is even multiplied by the inclusion of Jonah’s little sister in the scene. It doesn’t get more adorable than that!

more than this coverWinter Soldier: a book with a great twist (plot twist or retelling)

How could I not highlight the amazing plot twist of More Than This by Patrick Ness? I still remember the shock I felt when I first read it, even though it was a few years ago now. I never saw it coming!

gone coverI’m Just A Kid from Brooklyn: a book with a memorable setting/character backstory

Nearly all of the characters in the Gone series by Michael Grant have interesting, surprising, and complex backstories. Considering how many characters are introduced throughout these six books, that’s quite a feat!

matched coverDo You Two…. Fondue?: a book with a love triangle

SO. MANY. LOVE. TRIANGLES. There are a million books to choose from, but I’ll go with Matched by Ally Condie. I’m just going to be honest with you all: this love triangle was really annoying and simply bothersome. Like with most love triangles, there’s just so much drama involved!

life after life coverYou’ve Been Asleep, Cap: a book you love with a dual timeline/time travel

I’m not really sure what to call the twisting and turning timeline of Life After Life by Kate Atkinson…. Time travel? Multiple perspectives? Rewriting history? Whatever you’d like to call it, I’ve never read a novel that plays with time quite like this one does.

jellicoe road coverTil The End Of The Line: a book with the OTP to end all OTPs

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Taylor and Jonah from Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta are my favorite OTP, if I had to choose just one. If you haven’t read this book already, what are you waiting for?! ❤

IlluminaeI Had A Date: a book with a cliffhanger

I remember finishing Illuminae by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff and immediately wanting to read a sequel. The ending was way more intense and fast-paced than expected, especially considering the experimental format of the book itself. If you want a book that will leave you hanging, I definitely recommend this one!

fangirl coverI Understood That Reference: a book with a pop culture reference

The first book that popped into my mind when I read this prompt was predictably Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell. Though the pop culture reference in this book is fictional, Simon Snow resembles a popular magical series about wizards closely enough that I feel like it mirrors an actual reference.

What are your answers to these prompts? What do you think about the books I’ve mentioned? Who is your favorite superhero? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Cliches Book Tag

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Clichés are the best and worst things: though they can help you express your feelings quickly and easily, no one wants to hear the same old clichés over and over again. Luckily, the Clichés Book Tag puts a fresh twist on ancient sayings. Thanks so much to Ugne @ My Passion is Happiness for tagging me!

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky“Actions speak loud”: A book that wasn’t or couldn’t be better than the film.

This question is really difficult for me to answer because I’m usually a big proponent of books over their movie adaptations. However, I must admit that I think the movie adaptation of The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky is just as good as the book, if not better. Although I really enjoyed the book, I have such fond memories of going to see the movie in a theater with my friends in high school. I love everything about it: the cast, the soundtrack, and the climactic tunnel scene. For me, it’s the exception to the rule!

Great Expectations“The grass is always greener on the other side”: rags to riches, or a riches to rags, story.

How could I not mention my beloved Great Expectations by Charles Dickens? Not only is this a lovely bildungsroman, but it’s also the ultimate story of inadvertently climbing the socioeconomic ladder. The journey is certainly a winding, twisting road, but fortunately it all works out for poor Pip in the end.

the raven boys“The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree”: A parent-child relationship you loved

No parent-child relationship is perfect, even in fiction. Still, I loved the relationship between Blue and her mother Maura in The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater. This series has a strong family presence not often found in the Young Adult genre. Even more rare is that the family Blue lives with is all women– talk about female representation!

city of bones cover“You can’t judge a book by its cover”: A great book that NEEDS a better cover

Though I love Cassandra Clare’s Mortal Instruments series dearly, I have to be honest: I really dislike these cover designs! Models on covers are probably my least favorite design a book could have, and I think in this case it makes the covers look overdramatic and over the top. When it comes to cover designs, I believe that simple is always better!

My Antonia“You can’t please everyone”: A book you hated/loved that everyone else loves/hates

Last semester I was assigned to read My Ántonia by Willa Cather for my literature class and I immediately fell in love with it… the rest of my class, not so much. I loved the writing style, the almost ethereal ambience, the fascinating questions about nationality and gender performance that it raises.

16145154“What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger”: book you are better person for having read

Reading Seth Holmes’ ethnography Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Migrant Farmworkers in the United States last semester for my Introduction to Anthropology class made me realize the horrors, struggles, and hardships behind the fresh fruit on my kitchen table. This book has opened my eyes to the maltreatment of migrant farmworkers and the long road we have ahead of us towards changing this horrid, unjust system.

All the Light We Cannot See“Love is blind”: book with disabled character or actual “blind love”

Yes! Another excuse to mention my love for Anthony Doerr’s amazing historical fiction novel All the Light We Cannot See. Featuring Marie-Laure, a blind French girl living in Paris during World War II, this heart-wrenching story will captivate you from the very first page and not let you go until you’ve turned the very last one.

29069989“Ignorance is bliss”: A book you know is bad you don’t want to admit it, or a book you don’t want to read in case it’s bad

Even though I’ve already read it and I strongly dislike it, I’m still going to mention Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by J.K. Rowling, Jack Thorne, and John Tiffany. I went back and forth about reading this play for the longest time before finally giving in because I wanted to form my own educated opinion. I don’t necessarily regret my decision to read it, but I definitely could have lived my life without doing so. It’s safe to say that “disappointing” is definitely an understatement.

Jellicoe-Road-by-Melina-Marchetta_thumb“There is no time like the present”: Your favorite contemporary book

I’m going to go with my old standby favorite: Jellicoe Road by Melina Marchetta. I’ve discussed this book countless times on my blog at this point, but that hasn’t stopped me from talking about it even more. If you haven’t read this book yet, do yourself a favor and pick it up ASAP!

a game of thrones cover“Better safe than sorry”: A book you don’t want to read in case it’s bad or vice versa

I’ve been contemplating reading A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin for what seems like ages, but I’m afraid that it’s going to be too graphic or unsettling for me. I’ve heard these things about the TV show and I can’t help but fear that it all stems from the original book series. If you’ve read this series, please let me know what your thoughts on it are!

What books do these clichés remind you of? What do you think of the books that I’ve mentioned? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday: When Book Club Becomes Debate Club

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Happy Tuesday!! I hope you all had a fun and safe Halloween if you celebrate it!

This week’s Top Ten Tuesday topic is open-ended, allowing us to choose what kinds of books we would recommend to a book club. In the frustrating, bewildering spirit of the United States presidential election, I’ve decided to go with a rather contentious theme. Without further ado, here my Top Ten Books to Read If Your Book Club Likes to Debate. In some way, shape, or form, these books have sparked debate both within and beyond the book blogging community.

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger converThe Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

Some people find this book endlessly annoying due to all of Holden’s ranting, while others appreciate it for the way it portrays adolescence and the human experience. Personally, I’m in the latter camp!

we were liars coverWe Were Liars by E. Lockhart

The main point of contention with this short, summery book tends to be the dramatic ending. Was it obvious from the very beginning or does it actually deserve praise for being a shocking twist? Once again, I tend to side with the latter opinion– I never saw it coming!

wuthering heights coverWuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

I had a lot of mixed feelings about this classic novel, mostly because I was very confused by the characters’ similar names. It also came across as incredibly overdramatic… am I the only one who feels this way?

gone girl coverGone Girl by Gillian Flynn

This mystery novel is certainly good, but looking back I feel as though it is a bit overrated. There are so many other amazing mystery stories out there! (*cough* And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie *cough*)

anna and the french kiss coverAnna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins

I loved this book when I first read it years ago, but I’ve heard a lot of mixed reviews about it since then. It seems like people either really love it or have a lot of problems with the romantic relationships in it.

eat pray loveEat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert

Once again, I loved this book when I first read it; however, I was surprised to find that it has received a surprising number of mixed reviews. Many readers criticize Gilbert’s successful memoir for the story of a privileged, wealthy white women who travels to escape her problems. Personally, I thought it was inspiring, eye-opening, and offered a new perspective on life, happiness, and stepping out of your comfort zone.

the summer i turned pretty coverThe Summer I Turned Pretty by Jenny Han

I included this book on the list for one simple reason: sometimes it seems as though everyone loves this trilogy except for me. It wasn’t dreadful, but I disliked the main character and thought the romance was sort of lackluster overall.

allegiant coverAllegiant by Veronica Roth

Oh, the ending of this trilogy was sparked SO MUCH heated debate when it was first published. Though I understand some of the reasoning behind why it ended in the way that it did, I still don’t like it.

Great ExpectationsGreat Expectations by Charles Dickens

While reading this classic novel with my AP English class during my senior year of high school, I quickly realized that this book is pretty polarizing. My classmates tended to either empathize with Pip or think he was incredibly annoying, which made for some very interesting (and frustrating!) class discussions.

29056083Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by J.K. Rowling, John Tiffany, and Jack Thorne

Considering the enormous buzz surrounding this work, I think it pretty much goes without explanation. Though it saddens me to say this, I really disliked this unnecessary additional to the Harry Potter universe.

What books do you find controversial or often sparking heated discussions? What do you think of the books on my list? Do you agree or disagree with my opinions? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday: Characters I’d Name My Plants After

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Happy Tuesday! If you were to ever visit my dorm room then you would immediately understand my love for tiny plants. My roommate and I have a number of them sitting along our windowsill, eagerly waiting to cheer us up whenever we come back to the room after a long day. I adore my plants, but I must admit that I have a small problem with them: I don’t know what to name them.

Then I gratefully stumbled upon this week’s Top Ten Tuesday theme, an open-ended topic involving naming things after fictional characters. In an attempt to give some solace to my nameless plants, here are ten fictional characters I would consider naming them after: 

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Which of these names do you like best? What fictional characters would you name your plants after? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Top Ten Tuesday: Favorite Books I’ve Read for Class

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Happy Tuesday!! Since this new semester is now well underway and this week’s Top Ten Tuesday topic is open-ended, I thought I would share with you all my Top Ten Favorite Books I’ve Read for Class (that’s a genre, right? Well, it is now!). Assigned reading often has a bit of an undeserved bad reputation. Sure, you’re not going to love everything that you’re assigned to read for school, but isn’t that the point? Being forced to explore different genres, authors, and texts can open your eyes to new perspectives and topics you never knew you would enjoy learning about. Some of my all time favorite books were originally assigned reading for classes!

In the spirit of the back-to-school season, here are my top picks in the order that I read them:

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New York City-19

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Honorable Mentions: Lord of the Flies by William Golding {high school freshman}, Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer {high school freshman}, and The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins {college freshman}

What are some of the best books that you’ve had to read for school? What do you think of the books on my list? How do you feel about assigned reading in general? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

QUOTE: Charles Dickens

“That was a memorable day to me, for it made great changes in me. But it is the same with any life. Imagine one selected day struck out of it, and think how different its course would have been. Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation of the first link on one memorable day.”  ~ page 83 of Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

Great Expectations by Charles DickensThis is one of my favorite quotes from Great Expectations, in part because of its valuable message but also due to the way Dickens has written it. I love when authors address the reader in their books, and this was such a brilliant and clever way to do it. I read this quote about four times when I first came across it in the story, and it has stuck with me since then. It’s such an interesting thing to think about, how each day really matters despite the way they tend to blend together after a certain length of time.

What quotes have you discovered recently? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

Book Review: GREAT EXPECTATIONS

great expectations coverAuthor: Charles Dickens

Number of Pages: 554

Publisher: Penguin Books

Release Date: 1861

“Great Expectations, Dickens’ funny, frightening and tender portrayal of the orphan Pip’s journey of self-discovery, is one of his best-loved works. Showing how a young man’s life is transformed by a mysterious series of events – an encounter with an escaped prisoner; a visit to a black-hearted old woman and a beautiful girl; a fortune from a secret donor – Dickens’ late novel is a masterpiece of psychological and moral truth, and Pip among his greatest creations.”

– Goodreads.com

Great Expectations by Charles Dickens completely took me by surprise and exceeded all of my initial expectations. It is the best book I have ever been assigned to read in school (I read it with my AP English class) and my favorite book of 2015 so far. There are so many fantastic aspects of this novel- fitting them all into one review is going be a struggle!

Let’s start with one of the most obvious great things about this novel: Pip, the main character. I was captivated by Pip’s narration from the very first sentence. His youthful spirit and personality shine through the writing, and I couldn’t help but want to support him and cheer him on throughout the entire story. He certainly as flaws (his extreme naivety and impressionability, for example) but they only sere to increase his charm because he is so easy to relate to. The mistakes he makes can be translated to our own lives quite easily, despite the fact that his circumstances are quite unique. Also, I really liked the fact that even though Pip is telling the story when he is much older, his narration nevertheless reflects his age at the time. For example, during the beginning of the book his childish fear of the convict and ignorance of current events (the Hulks) are captured perfectly by the impressive vocabulary of adult Pip. Not only does Pip’s narration create more depth to his own personality and development as a character, but it also makes the story even more entertaining.

Pip isn’t the only remarkable character, however- Dickens has created an entire cast of incredible personalities to captivate and enthrall us. Take Miss Havisham, for example. She’s so heartbroken that she’s driven herself insane, locked in the moment of her wedding day before it all took a turn for the worse. Or Estella, the girl Miss Havisham has been training to break the hearts of men like she herself was never able to do. And then there’s Mr. Joe Gargery, the husband of Pip’s abusive sister, whose heart is so kind that even in Pip’s darkest times, he reminds him that they will always be “ever the best of friends”. There is more than meets the eye to nearly every character in this novel, and by the end I was astounded by how seamlessly their lives connect and intertwine. 

The plot itself was captivating and never dull, even though the book is quite long. Between Pip’s entertaining narration and countless twists and surprises I was never bored. This is very much a character-driven novel, but the plot was still interesting and well planned out. I love the fact that there are two endings- the one that Dickens originally wanted to include, and the one that ended up being included in the story that is published today. The publisher back then (or person he was writing for, I don’t know if it was necessarily a publisher) didn’t like how the original ending was not very happy, so Dickens wrote one that had more of a “happily ever after” feel to it. The copy of this book that I got from my high school’s library had both endings in the back, and I have to say that I like the original one better. It fits the bittersweet tone of the book way better than the other ending does, and I can’t help but think that if Dickens initially wanted it to end that way then that’s the way it should end.

I was really surprised by how much I loved the writing in this book. I enjoyed Dickens’ writing style in A Tale of Two Cities, but I absolutely LOVED it in Great Expectations!! It was witty and charming and there were times when I actually laughed out loud while reading it. (Sorry people in the school library during eighth period- Dickens is just too funny!) The word choice was impressive but not overwhelmingly difficult to understand, and there are just so many quotes that I couldn’t help but highlight in my book. Dickens’ writing is definitely one of my favorite aspects of this book!

Overall, I LOVED LOVED LOVED Great Expectations- when I finished reading it I felt like I wanted to give it a hug and read it all over again. It’s such a timeless story, mostly because it is so easy to relate to the feelings and experiences Pip has as he grows up. I am so happy that I was assigned to read this for class- if this doesn’t prove that my teacher has great taste in books, I don’t know what does!

My Rating: :0) :0) :0) :0) :0) 5 out of 5 smileys (or A MILLION smileys!!!)

Would I recommend it to a friend?: Absolutely! Anyone and everyone should read this book!

Have you read this book before? What did you think of it? What other books by Charles Dickens would you recommend? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY

WWW Wednesdays: February 4th

WWW Wednesdays ModifiedWWW Wednesdays is a meme hosted by Sam @ Taking on a World of Words that asks three questions:

Ony Everything by Kieran ScottWhat are you currently reading???

Right now I’m reading Only Everything by Kieran Scott, which I won in a Goodreads giveaway quite a while ago. I’m not that far into it yet, but so far I’m a bit disappointed. The narrator is sort of annoying and the romance seems really superficial. Hopefully it gets better soon!

I’m also still reading Harry Potter y la cámara secreta by J.K. Rowling (the Spanish translation of Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets).

What did you recently finish reading???great expectations cover

I FINALLY FINISHED READING GREAT EXPECTATIONS!!! I’ve been reading this with my AP English class for several weeks now and I have to say that I ADORED this novel. It was FANTASTIC!!! I can’t wait to write a review! ❤

A Little Something Different by Sandy Hall coverWhat do you think you’ll read next???

Hopefully something from my physical TBR! Some possibilities include Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, A Little Something Different by Sandy Hall, etc.

What are your answers to these questions? Let me know in the comments section below!

Yours,

HOLLY